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pet-safe termite control i live in bombay (India) in a studio apartment. the partment is full of old wooden furniture. i have a persian kitten for a pet. for the last 4 months ive been finding very tiny off-white grains of stuff in large bunches under specific corners of the furniture. i have also seen extremely tiny white insects crawling in the wood. last week i found 3 holes in my shirt, and 3 very well-fed fat white ants around them!!! im horrified. i have an ongoing contract with a pest control agency here in bombay, but they do these herbal paste applications that havent seemed to help. i want to know if there is a specific fumigation procedure and/or product that is completely kitten-safe, and that will stop these lil beasts from eating up my world. thanks. Coptotermes spp, a drywood genus, and Reticulitermes spp, a subterranean genus, act differently from each other. The drywood termite can settle in wooden furniture that has unfinished surfaces. Unlike the drywood, the subterraneans attack wood from a soil-born colony that does not reside in the wood, but continually enters and exits the wood source; returning to the soil for moisture in most cases. Exception may occur when there remains a constant moisture supply, such as a chronic leak that keeps a wood source moist. You mention paste or gel type treatments against this supposed termite invasion of your furniture. I am not aware of any current product that is a proven termiticide, fitting your reference. I do know of products that are eco-sensitive and could be tested against your furniture concern. EcoPCO IC, would probably take care of your problem. It can be applied as a concentrate or dilution according to label instructions. In addition, you can contact www.plusnaturalenzymes.com, and see their literature on line. I have introduced tools that will effect rapid results immediately; however reaching the pest source may require drilling into the wood. As regards treating an underground colony, these items may not prove entirely satisfactory, but they will destroy insects when they are contacted. The first product mentioned, will also have a repellency as well. Sorry for the delay, I've been extraordinarily busy. Good luck and best wishes Elton, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com Pest Control chicago

 

Expanded Question:

We own a house in Honolulu, Hawaii.  It was treated with a liquid treatment 11 years ago.  Two years ago, termites were found in a deck (not the ground termites though) so the house was tented.  Terminix doesn't recommend the bait system (ineffective according to salesperson) and instead encouraged liquid treatment and/or "termite inspection and protection plan" (the latter includes NO treatment, but they will inspect and fix house if necessary).  We would like to keep the cost and chemicals to a minimum.  What do you recommend?

Answer:

Subterranean termites can be baited, but, to my knowledge above ground specie are not currently treated by baiting as an effective protocol.



There are more recent methods for treating other than subterranean.  The use of heat, freezing, carbon dioxide, silica gels, and borates have all found a place in termite remediation.

I suggest that you contact the University of Hawaii, and the Hawaii Pest Control Association for in depth guidance.  The association can be contacted at 677 Ala Moana Blvd., Ste. 815, Honolulu, HI 96813; ph. 808-533-2739.

If you need further assistance, please contact me again.



Best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

Pest Control Chicago

American Pest Solutions

 

Termite Prevention on Land


My in-laws had an old mobile home that was recently removed.  Underneath the house were piles of wood that termites have (and are still) eating.  We will be dumping the wood scrap soon and will be grading the land with select field (sand/concrete mixture) to avoid any water underneath the new house that we will be putting in its place.

My question is, what should we do now as a preventative before the new house is on the land to prevent the termites from returning?  We would like to reduce costs and do this ourselves if possible.
 


Removing wood and soil aggregate from the surface where termites remain active can help you prepare for a pretreatment of that site for your new construction, but that will not secure the new building from termite invasion.

Treatment of the soil and gravel/cement combination that you are using to provide better drainage is a good idea.  In addition, that ground surface must be treated with a termiticide to an average depth of at least three inches, after you have set the footing and mechanicals in place.  The termiticide that you purchase, for example, Premise 75, will have with it a complete set of instructions for the dilution of, and rate of application per square foot to the proper depth.  You can rent an electric or gas driven pump/sprayer system to make the necessary application.

If you want to order the termiticide, you can find a supplier linked from our website, www.pestproblemssolved.com.

Best Wishes,


George Manning

Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

 

Lou


Termite and Mice Professionals


We've had a couple of inspections regarding termite prevention and a possible mouse problem (living in attic).  Our home is in Virginia, and before we sign up for an expensive service, there are some quick questions:


I've heard conflicting info on termites.  Although nothing of signficance has been spotted during the inspections (one minor issue), the well-respected pros recommended the Sentricon system.  Your thoughts? 

The pro also noticed (possibly) mouse feces in the garage, and possible burrow holes in our attic's insulation (we have that loose white insulation).  No noises or evidence of mice in the kithcen yet, knock wood.  They want to set some traps and poison, too.  No pets so no issue here. Is there something else for me to look for?  It's a big house so checking outside for holes takes some time.  Is ther a chance that they climb up the siding and get in through a  hole in the attic fan?

What are your general thoughts about this?  I will be seeking additional inspections from other companies, primarily to see if they all spot the same things.  Thank you very much.

Hello Lou:

Your questions are clear and well thought out.

I'll answer your mouse inquiry first.  As mice settle in a staging area somewhere close to your home, they will eventually seek to spread to new territory.  Since they colonize, they live as a community of sorts, dominated by a male mouse with a number of females, usually at tops 15, plus a few male hopefuls which are suppressed from breeding by the dominant male.  At this point additional mice will be pushed out or be killed by those that are more mature and aggressive.  So starts the push for new territory, in this case, your home.

Entry points can be the insulated copper refrigeration line that passes through the exterior wall from your air conditioner compressor, space at lowest point behind vinyl siding; particularly at the exterior corners of the house, other foundation openings, and of course, where space allows entry below exterior doors.  

Once inside, mice will locate where nesting is inviting, usually as close as possible, and often in attic spaces where insulation provides nesting quality plus safety.  Mice reach the attic from within the plumbing wall or other vertical chases used for the building's mechanicals.

A food source is paramount For breeding.  Without ample food, mice will not breed to numbers, and can be easily wiped out by baits, traps or glue boards.  When effort is made to destroy an existing population, the requirement is total elimination, otherwise the breeding goes on, and that base population remains successful. Food can be as inconspicuous as the food and grease dropped through the top burners of the stove, and left out dog and cat food.  In other words, kill 'em all or keep them.  Traps may be too labor intensive.  It might be easier to amply bait the attic space where these openings (burrows) appear, and around the soil stack drop through the house.

Regarding termites, the SentroCon System is a growth regulator system which requires regular visits by the installer company.  First a clear pine stake is installed as an attractant, and then, once termites find the inserted stake within the monitor receptacle,  presoaked insect growth regulator (IGR) cardboard insert replaces the pine stake, and the termite workers in the wood are shaken into the monitor receptacle over the IGR.  These monitors(inserts) are spaced about every ten feet around the circumference of your home.  Where termites strike, the process is repeated.  As the IGR inserts are consumed, they are replaced by new ones.  The inspections become less frequent as the inserts are no longer in use.  The claim is never elimination, but severe reduction.  The possibility of colony collapse and then complete elimination is possible.  There are so many pros and cons to this form of treatment.  Several negatives are that termites may not strike, or if they do, there may be only several strikes which address a single colony but not possible other colonies. Since termites pass food and water from one to another far reaching kill is likely.  There is a study being conducted by Bayer MFG that seeks to determine if there is interactivity between separate colonies.  Comparative DNA studies are part of the focus.  Termites reproduce by budding,  (reproductives, guards, and workers establishing a new colony), and by swarming of males and females that can mate and reenter the ground to begin a new society of these creatures.  Since you asked about SentroCon, I am describing behavior of Subterranean termites only.  In your region, other specie of termites may exist too.

These days, there are several termiticide applications that are becoming a preference for many termite companies, and they are Premise 75, and Termidore.  There are others as well. The industry still uses termiticides that kill as the application initiates and then repels termites as they attempt to reach structure from inside or from outside the home.  The newer termiticides I named are non-repellent and thus termites continue to be destroyed as they remain in proximity of the home.  It is thought that as termites pass the liquid termiticide as they do water, they are initially impacted while the product is still binding with the soil particulate, they destroy each other.

With IGR treatments that do not attract, and therefore do not impact the termite colony within one year, the use of a conventional insecticide becomes obligatory.

I hope that I've armed you with discernment so that you can more comfortably consult the pros in your region.

Contact me again if you have additional questions.  

Best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: George,


This is an incredibly detailed and comprehensive reply, and I thank you sincerely for the time and effort.  If I may, I'd like to ask some specific questions (based on what I've learned so far).

Entry Points: Based on the areas you mentioned, should I make a strong effort to check each spot?  Or, is it better to do what I can in terms of obstructing entry points (w/o becoming obsessed)?  

Baiting/poison: If a professional exterminator does the work, is there a specific type of poison I should request?  As far as the pros go, do they all use something relatively similar?  Also, what about the odor that may emanate from dead and rotting mice.  Is it relatively negligeable?  Previous owners (we've been there 2 months) had a cat, and we're assuming the current mild odor is from the cat's time spent on the carpet.

 Detection: Other than scurrying about in the attic (not heard yet) and feces, what other signs are giveaways of mice in the house?  

Misc: We're good about the food and have no pets, but your point about grease is well taken. Are there any cleaning agents that annoy and/or dissuade the mice from coming into an area?  And what is a soil stack drop?

Termites: Please correct me on this, but from your response, I gathered that you prefer the termiticide applications as opposed to the SentroCon system.  We've had two inspections so far (January 2008 and late October 2007). Our last inspection revealed only a small termite "tunnel" under the front porch (a support of untreated wood for the synthetic porch).  Our home is with vinyl siding, built in 1986 and backs up to a wooded lot.   Based on this limited info, what would be better: termiticide of SentraCon. And, yes, George, I understand your limitation in answering this broad question.

Our concern with the termiticdes is the invasive quality of its application (drilling in floors, etc.).  The rep made it seem like hell, and it's hard to determine if he's simply trying to sell a more expensive system (SentraCon) or providing great info.  He said that the termiticides tend to break down relatively or if they hit a rock, disperse underground and become ineffective.  Sales pitch or truth?

Again, let me thank you (my wife does too!) for your excellent response.  I've learned a great deal from you, and hope you don't mind the extra questions.

Hello Again Lou:

I must confess, I do enjoy my field of work and have always liked helping others, when I am able to help them to themselves,as they are searching for solutions in my field of endeavor.  

Point one, the need to check detail for termite presence is important.  The possibility of spot-treating a single focal point of entry and then possibly continuing a few feet in either direction of that spot has real merit, but is not practical if using the all out methods under the SentroCon System.

My preference is the use of an anticoagulant bait that is placed where mice are staging a build-up such as in your attic.  Secondly placing bait under kitchen platforms or between walls and cabinetry where darkened areas indicate frequency of travel.  The use of bait stations placed where mouse droppings accumulate, or along walls in these locations, is my last resort; certainly not the first. Our website will link you to our supplier where bait choices can be made.  Weuse several brands, and the staff can elaborate on that.  

Odor from poisoning is much reduced when using anticoagulants.  Most of the time there is no odor because the mice often die where they live within walls.

Mouse droppings, which average the size of long grain rice, are the easiest sign of mouse presence.  An individual mouse can leave as much as 30 droppings per day.  Varied dropping size will aid one to determine population estimates.  Also darkened surfaces rubbed as mice pass through a tight spot will indicate length of presence when considered along with varied dropping size.

In my previous response, soil stack drop referred to the stack pipe that passes upward from the sewer system through the home's wall soffiting and exits through the roof.

Based on your information regarding choice of termiticides, I would choose a liquid application.

The vinyl siding, when it drops to ground level, covering any concrete footing above ground level, can hide termite evidence, but there are inside viewpoints too.  Vinyl can be pulled back for closer examination.

The SentroCon representative was referring to comprehensive termiticide applications as he compared such to his baiting program.  There is more flexability when using termiticides.  As regards termiticide longevity, the rep was misinformed, in my opinion.  The target for residual presence is the soil itself, whereby, the chemical hygroscopically adhers to the particulate matter, creating a bridging effect, particle to particle, in so doing setting up barrier or killing field.

In our industry, we have become the exception rather than the rule.  Whereas the industry wishes to press down on maintenance and management, we look to specificity as applied to elimination.

Best wishes and thanks for the critique,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist
Pest Control Chicago
Termite Exterminator Chicago
American Pest Solutions

 

termites Am I correct in all the information about termites that for a quick kill you would use, THERMIDOR or PREMISE and then use a trap bait procedure? I noticed some damage in the garage and had swarmers. The time frame for the termites would be about MAY 2008 when they may have swarmed in TN. The area is on a slab to earth contact in the garage. Which procedure do you prefer? I am drawn to the THERMIDOR because the others want to do a quarterly inspection. My choice would be to get this treated and then go to HOME DEPOT and get the Spectrum Baiters. Termidore is ok. The product is apparently not detected by subterranean termites--neither is Premise 75. I am enclosing a previous questioners communication with my answer. This may help you. Bait stations are great if termites do strike. If they don't, and this often is the case, you'll eventually go to a termiticide like Termidore or Premise 75(Imidaclopred), or Dominion. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Another Termite Pest Control question I live in a 1400 square foot cedar siding home on a monolithic concrete slab. (whew) I have evidence of termite intrusion in my home but cannot locate any area of current activity, only some damage. I am going to do the treatment myself. I am currently looking at using Dominion barrier treatment or Advance bait system. Which would you recommend? I am leaning towards the Dominion which is a generic formulation of Premise. I am pretty handy so either way is within my ability. Any help or advice you could give me is greatly appreciated...Paul ANSWER: Imidaclopred is an excellent termiticide. Dominion has formulated their product now since the patent protection has expired, and it is now open season for developing the product lines away from the original formulator, Bayer. Barrier treatments are more immediate, giving greater results in less time; however, one's skill level in applying the product is more demanding. The season is rapidly going away. I would select the Dominion because I'd want to know if I've done it all before cooler months and winter arrives. If you know that yours is an outside condition, you could avoid drilling interior slab, and depend on the exterior treatment. Baits are more labor intensive, but can destroy a colony quickly when there is immediate acceptance. What if the termites delay in choosing a bait station?---You lose time. Follow instructions and don't take short-cuts. Regards Paul, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com ---------- FOLLOW-UP ---------- QUESTION: Thank you so much for your reply George. I applied the Dominion today. I trenched around my home per the instructions and applied it at the recommended higher concentration at 4 gallons per feet. I dammed up the trench in areas of elevation change to make sure I got consistent coverage. I also rodded the trench about every 18 inches about an extra 8 inches of depth just to make sure I got good soil permeation. On the back of my house, which has the most soil moisture I treated it once and then treated it again with a mixture that was double what was called for. Just in case. My home had been drilled before so in the concrete areas I used a funnel and placed about a half gallon in each hole. The holes were placed about a foot apart. I also poured all along the cracks where the walkway meets the foundation and the patio meets the house, in addition to filling the holes. I poured 3 gallons in the location in my house where the termites had come in (The plumbing coming through my laundry room floor) That took a while because I allowed it to seep into the soil as much as possible. I wanted really good coverage there just in the unlikely event they got through my barrier. I was very careful handling the chemicals and did not allow any to contact my skin. I wore chemical resistant gloves. It took me a good full day of work to do it but I'm pretty pleased with how it went and honestly do not think most professionals would have done as good a job. And it cost less than $200.00. If I'm still here I'm planning on doing it again as needed or in 5 years. Thanks again...Paul Answer: The application that you completed is more than adequate. I appreciate your detailing the procedure for me. Why don't you send your procedure to Dominion. I feel certain that they will use your story. You may get some additional advice from them. As to a treatment in 5 years, I'm not certain that this would be necessary. Of course the manufacturer may comment on this. It's been good communicating with you. The best to you Paul, and happy Fourth, George Manning --------------------------------------------------------------------- If you require additional help, please contact me again Greg. Best wishes, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com Pest Control Chicago

 

Expanded Question:

We purchased an old house in Los Angeles, CA, three years ago, and even though the sellers did some minor termite treatment and inspection before we took possession of the property, a year later we found new termites, 2 kinds, in several different areas (roof, closets and hardwood floors) of the house.



After vacating and having Anticimex tenting the house for a whopping $3,000, we were prompted to sign up for an 'termite insurance', which we did. The house has been visible clear of termites ever since.



My question is, what are the chances of getting termites again in the next few years? I would assume the chemicals used during tenting would still linger in the building, hopefully remaining a strong repellent and therefore 'protect' the building from termites for a while?

I realize it's a gamble and hard to predict what Mother Nature might do, but if at all possible I would prefer to save my money now that times are hard, instead of shelling out $400 yearly for this insurance, which some people tell me is a scam.

I would appreciate your expert opinion on the longterm effectiveness of these tenting treatments! Perhaps there are better options?

With warm regards,


Carol


Los Angeles, CA


Answer:

The website, ag.arizona.edu/pubs/insects/az1232, should be your first point of reference, Carol.

I'd be pleased to answer questions, if you have any, once you have reviewed the entire, well constructed and fully informative publication.



Thank you for consulting me.

Best regards and wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

Pest Control Chicago

American Pest Solutions

Fireplace We have termite tunnels coming out from behind the mantel of our fireplace. We have a wood panel above our mantel going up to the ceiling. We have had the roof checked for leaks and had a termite guy drill holes in the drywall inside where the wooden panel meets the ceiling, and he then sprayed but they keep coming back. So do we have to cut the drywall on the ceiling to inspect for termite damage. ANd would you recommend pulling off the wooden panel above the mantel. The termites trails come out from the sides and down below . Please help! Thanks Andrew. It sounds as if you have subterranean termites. in what part of the Country do you reside? It may be important for me to know that. The clay tubes are indicative of the species mentioned. The application that was made against these creatures does not sound sufficient to eliminate them. Certainly a chronic leak from the roof could provide a sufficient water supply that could keep termites active without their returning to the soil. When you corrected the leak, you may have had an effect on the termite presence. Sometimes this act can cause termites to move on. The fact that they derive moisture from the soil, would indicate that they may still be present. Knock down all the mud tubing and see if termites will build again. You may see termites crawling where the dirt has fallen after destroying the tubes. Better yet, open a tube and watch to see if these tiny creatures are moving up and down within the tubes. I'll talk to you further when you fill me in. Regards Andrew, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemsolved.com Pest Control Chicago

 

termites I have discovered that termites have visited my house and garages. I have talked to 3 professional so far and done quite a bit of research online. How does one know which method to use? Some use the loquid method and treat outside and inside. A new method is the Advance system with bait stations. There are big differences in prices also. It more or less boils down to using bait stations or liquid treatments. Which to use???? I used some Spectricide myself 2-3 yrs. ago and got ripped off. I bought bait stations but now unable to purchase any more bait. Any advice will be appreciated. I live in south-central Nebraska. I have never found anything live, just where they have been. Termite evidence and no sign of current activity may be good news. Your previous use of brand name, Spectrocide may have been useful. That product is known as active ingredient, Diazinon, an organo-phosphate insecticide. It is not , and was not used by professionals against subterranean termites. If you use a commercial monitoring system that houses a clear red or white pine wood cutting, you may draw termites to the stations. If termites strike, then you will know that termites still exist at points around your home. Another way is to sink a 12 inch long plastic tube in the ground that has multiple 3/8 inch holes, and within the tube place an 11 inch pine peg. Foraging termites may locate a series of these home-made devices that you have driven into the soil surrounding your house. Confirmation of a termite strike within a device will lead you to contact a termite company. If you know that termites do exist, my choice would be a chemical application. When termites do not contact these commercial monitors or your home-made devices, that may not mean there are no termites. Termites may not move to these monitors in a timely fashion. Professionals will sell you monitor/baiting services but back this up with a chemical treatment in a year if nothing strikes a proven active termite area. Probably, the baiting technique will cost more than the termiticide application, and will not be guaranteed until the IGR inserts replace the monitors that termites strike. The follow-up inspections will add to the original cost to total more than the conventional treatment by termiticide application. The two newest and most frequently used termiticides are Premise75, and Termidor. Both of these products have similar claims. You can look up these termiticides as well as the Centricon system by Dow/Elanco. I hope that I've been of service to you. Please contact me again for more in depth information if you have further questions. Best wishes, George Manning Consulting Entomologist george@pestproblemssolved.com Pest Control Chicago

Termites in soffit/roof sheathing

Question
I live in central Connecticut. My roofing contractor crew just replaced a 5' x 4' wet rotted area of roof sheathing below a valley in the roof above the front door of my house. My attic and the rest of the roof sheathing was dry except for the area just mentioned.

I got a new roof because two weeks before this, I had noticed water slowly dripping down through the plaster ceiling above the front door inside my foyer. I went up into the attic and saw water dripping in at the seams of the roof sheathing directly above the front door area. I placed containers to catch the water. It had been raining here for 6 weeks. The next day I went onto the roof and saw crumbling shingles below the chimney and an old antenna base screwed through the roof - that were probably letting water in and under them to the point where it seeped down to what became the problem area. I put roofing black cement in places and started looking for a roofing contractor.

The house has eaves that overhang the actual house wall by about 3 feet. Last week I had the double layered old roof stripped and when they cut out the wet/damp sheathing area, the guy yelled down to me that I have termites. He said they were moving away from the opening he just cut out. Since they were about to put new sheathing over that area, I raced down to the nearby hardware store and came back with 3 cans of termite spray. It was by Bonide for termites and carpenter ants. It was what they had. They emptied 2 cans into that area. I went into the attic with the 3rd can but saw no visible insects. They put new sheathing in place and the roofing was completed a few days ago.

Before I have some company out here, I really want to understand a few things. Can these be dampwood termites since there are no mud tunnels anywhere inside or outside my house? Even in this part of the country? Do drywood termites also live in/near damp wood? Are they most likely eastern subterranean? There a few tall oak trees whose smaller branches end up on my roof from time to time, but I see no evidence of anything having made tunnels from the ground to the trees or to my house. There was a 2 inch opening under the valley of the old roof which did not let water in because of the angles, but is just above the problem area. A flying termite could have entered that way?

Do they eat plaster and lathe? I'm concerned about cutting out the formerly wet area of the foyer ceiling and having bugs drop down. I plan to remove the aluminum soffit and expose the wood soffit from below that valley in the roof across to above the front door with a contractor friend this weekend. This is the soffit area directly below the former leaking roof sheathing. If the boards are damp or rotted we will remove them. My plan is to remove some, even if it is not damp, to look up into the eave space of the attic to see any termite activity. Then to have Termidor sprayed and foamed in, from the opening we make in the soffit up into the eaves and also by going into the attic and treating the area from there.

I spent time online looking at termite pictures and reading about them. The only one I personally saw was yesterday. A slim black straight antenna body with what looked like one set of thin long wings walking on the outside of the window about 8 feet over from the area where the roof sheathing was replaced. About 3/8" or so long.

Please don't just tell me to get a professional out here to inspect. I know I need to and will do so next week. Other than that what can you tell me now about ways to handle this situation? And what should I look for? If some get away, can they live in the attic area with no moisture anymore?

Your time and expertise are appreciated. Thank you!"

Answer
You, Robert, deserve a response in detail. I found your review of your "termite" situation. The well-written detailed report deserved a more immediate answer. I do apologize for this delay; however, I'll answer your concerns now; point for point:

You do not have drywood termites, nor do you dampwood termites. If, indeed, you have termites, they are eastern subterranean termites, and nothing else. They arrived by reaching the roof from the soil. Since your roof was boggy and chronically wet, the termites did not require to and from the soil activity. In fact, the colony could have budded off the primary colony; either becoming independent, or simply remaining an extension of the colony that lives in the soil.

Some termiticides kill, but will repel termites too. These products may prevent those termites above the ground from returning to home base. This can develop into, what we call a stranded colony if there remains a chronic moisture supply. Today's two competing termiticides of choice, Termidor and Premise 75, do not repel termites, and thus, they are not aware of the toxic field set up in a building's earth-bound foundation. Consequently, kill is more thorough while termites persist in moving through the treated soil.

If you have corrected the damage, thoroughly dried out the surrounding wood, and additionally, already applied your own termite product, there is every chance that termites could still harbor within your building. It would be wise to call in a professional who could examine all aspects of your home. You may be fortunate, and the active area of termites could have spread your treatment within the colony to some degree, but I doubt it. The product, Bonide Termite and Carpenter Ant Killer's active ingredient is permethrin, within a classification known as pyrethroid. This one would repel, kill on contact, and remain residually active for weeks in the wood. You will need to search for further activity at the base timbers of the home and upward. One does not always find tubing; these tunnels being concealed behind wood or mortar.

Get rid of the worry by finding a competent termite company. As a youngster, years ago, I worked for Bliss Exterminaters out of New York City. What I liked was that all their supervisors came from the building trades. I worked for them in a four state area, in all terrains, and respected the structural awareness these supervisors brought to the table.

Finally, this common species does send out reproductives called alates, winged, they will take flight, mate and then seek a location within soil to start a new colony. I already mentioned budding, which is another way to propagate new colonies.

I have heard that Bayer, the makers of Premise 75, have funded a graduate program to study Termite DNA for commonality between separate colonies. I don't have information but you may be interested in contacting Bayer. I will do so when a moment provides me the opportunity.

I hope that I have been helpful Robert. Contact me again if I can be of service.

Best regards,

George Manning
Consulting Entomologist
www.pestproblemssolved.com

 

Termidor Hi there, I have a question to the safety of Termidor, it says on their website that its low toxicity however, i am terrified of chemicals.. What's worse is that i have already had my home that we are building pre-treated with Termidor, what they did was we had the footer dug, (we only had concrete blocks on the footers, no concrete slab just dirt crawl space, anyways, it has a garage and there is footer that runs across the inside of the house as well so kinda like you divided it in half and put an extra middle footer, only closer to one side, ok with that said, the pest guy sprayed all of the footer, and the concrete guys came out and poured concrete in the footer, all EXEPT, they left out about a three foot wide area in the footer for a crawl space, and 16 foot for the garage door, (they wanted to wait until later to pour the entire garage floor) so there was two openings and the 20x20 garage that was treated and left to the elements. This scares me. It is still not covered over with concrete, and is pretty far along in the building phase. The garage was eventually poured, but still didnt cover the termidor spray at the end. and of course we have the bare termidor sprayed crawl space. well now they are working on the plumbing and hvac, and they are going in and out of that crawl space going through the termidor tracking it into my house im presuming, as theres dirt everywhere, and im scared silly.. do you have any suggestions? Thanks :) Termidor has a high mammalian toxicity, meaning that it would take much more than other pesticides to register harm to human and animal. If the product was carried in on one's shoes, the residual time that traces of termiticide would be present is short in duration. there is little concern for toxicity in this case. Termidor has a long presence in soil. Termites do not detect its presence, and therefor, when travelling through soil, termites make contact with the poison without realizing that they are being contacted by the killing agent. I would say that it is entirely possible that termites will pass from a treated area to one that is untreated, and in so doing, become disoriented and will die. The manufacturer is claiming that you have only to treat one side of a bearing wall to kill off their presence Best wishes CC, George Manning www.pestproblemssolved.com george@pestproblemssolved.com Pest Control Chicago

Expanded Question:

Due to a plumbing situation, I have a hole in one of my walls.  My mother suggested that since I have access, I should place a bomb in the wall to get at bugs hiding in there. I wanted some advise as to whether that is a good idea or not. It sounds like a reasonable thing to do since that is where they live, but I just want to be sure I won't be harming the structures inside the wall.


Thanks


CJ

Answer:

A self release bomb in a plumbing wall where roaches reside, can be helpful.  So, yes to your question.  Not knowing what species of bug that you want to eliminate, I have to assume that some kind of roach is pestering you. 



There will not be any damage to property as a consequence of releasing such a bomb.  It would be wise to remain away from the area of the released bomb for a half hour following the event.
You should cover the hole temporarily during the treatment so that the pesticide can be the most beneficial.



If you are seeking specific help in your quest to wipe out any particular "bug", please contact me again.

Best wishes CJ,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

Nancy


Cockroaches in Cabinets


I live in Florida, have pest control service, occasionally have roach inside, ?  is there anything to safely spray when i come across one in kitchen cabinet? maybe natural product since bug spray & dishes aren't compatible?
 


Hello Nancy--

Having roaches in cabinets occasionally sounds like a low level but developing population.  Not knowing what species you are seeing may be a bit of a problem for me.  Here are some of the roaches that you could be seeing:  Brown banded roaches are not attracted to baits--
some may work, ask the entomology department, University of Florida. They glue their egg capsules to many objects.  The adults readily fly.
German roaches may be confused with Asian roaches, most likely a transplant from Taiwan.  The Asian is quite comfortable in the grassy 
outdoors, but is attracted to the lit TV screen to which it may fly and then can become an insider.  This is not to say that they won't enter without such an attractant.  Young palmetto bugs, also roaches, will frequent those cabinets too.  The most likely will be the German roach, which goes hand in hand with kitchen cabinets.  

Not all roaches require moisture in close proximity, certainly not the brown bandids, nor the Asians, but the Germans do want that ready moisture supply.  Palmetto bugs are not as dependent on water as are the Germans.

A commercial roach bait can be applied to cracks and crevices as a paste.  The newest DuPont roach gel might be a good bet.  The University at Gainesville is a good place to contact.  You can google the roaches I've mentioned.  You can also look up the University mentioned, and also Purdue University Entomology Department from where I graduated as an entomologist many years ago.

American Pest Solutions

Pest Control Chicago

Hi,
We came home from a weekend trip and there were flies everywhere in our house, and dozens of baby cockroaches in our bathtub. We hadn't left any dirty dishes or trash in our house, and we seem to have gotten the flies under control. However, I can't seem to get rid of the cockroaches. We've lived here for four years and have never had roaches inside. From online pictures, I think they are oriental cockroaches; we do have them everywhere outside here (CA). They are only in the bathtub but they are there when I wake up in the morning, and although I rinse those ones out, there are more in the evening. I clean the tub out with bleach each time I see them, but I don't know how to keep them from coming back. I have read that they can live in unused pipes, but with four people in the house, there are three showers and one bath being taken each day. I have a toddler, and I don't want to use anything harmful to her. Also we only have the one bathroom, so we can't leave bait or poison out, since we need to use the tub daily. It's been five days now, and I would greatly appreciate any tips you have for getting rid of them.

Answer 
Oriental, American, and other sewer loving roaches can enter your home via shower,floor and tub drains.

If you have an overflow vent on your tub, you can place a gel bait such as Maxforce within the vent.  this will attract the roaches, or during the time you are not using the tub, bait the drain.

If you have an intercepter sewer called a catch basin, you may find adult and various stages of development of these roaches.  Sometimes extreme rainfall will drive roaches into your house sewer lines.  The same can be true for extreme dry spells when lines are so dry that roaches access the home lines.

Flushing out the drains with a powder known as Drione may be the ticket since the roaches are so close to the tub's surface.

Contact me again if help is still needed.

Best wishes,


George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminstor

 

Question George, Thanks for your time. I live in a wooded area in PA. I have seen large roaches outside on the side of my house. They were pretty large. I have also seen some on my fire wood stack outside. Today, I found a light brown roach in my basement, on the drop ceiling tile, just sitting there. It has wings and appears to be less than an inch long. It is a lot smaller and lighter than the ones I saw last summer on the side of my house. I think I may have brought it in this winter with my firewood. I called an exterminator and saved the little critter. Any ideas on what it may be and how to control for them? I have baits in the basement and kitchen. I have a finished basement with a drop ceiling. I run a humidifier in the summer so it is pretty dry. I am worried this little guy has family and will reproduce quickly. Finally, I call erlich and have someone coming out Monday. Any insight into their reliability/costs? Thank you for your time. chris Answer The outside roaches are probably wood roaches, more exactly, Pennsylvania wood roaches, Parcoblatta pennsylvanica. The males are about two inches long, having a yellow border to their wings. They are usually chestnut colored. Females do not have wings, only wing pads, and look like female oriental roaches, Blatta orientalis. These roaches are our only native northern roach species. The roach that you describe sitting on the ceiling tiles, as you describe it, could be a brown banded roach, Supella longipalpa, or the German cockroach, Blatella germanica, if indeed it was a roach. Best wishes, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com

 

Expanded Question:

We built and moved into our brand new home 17 months ago.  Since we moved in I have found 4 cockroaches.  We have a full daylight basment that isn't finished.  2 I found downstairs in my laundry area and 2 upstairs in the kitchen(one of them being when I was actually unpacking from moving in)  After I found the third(now mind you this is months and I means months apart.........between 3rd and 4th it has been 7 months) I put this stuff down all over that is cockroach bait with egg stoppers or something like that.  I can't remember the exact name, maybe raid?  I put that everywhere upstairs and down, bathrooms, bedrooms ect.  Well this morning as I was doing laundry(in the basement) I picked up a towel and there one was.  (the 4th one)  Where have these things come from and how can I get rid of them?  Never ever seen one in my life until we moved into our NEW home.  Where we live is pretty wooded and I have found the occassional cricket in my basement but none this year.  I am really starting to freak out here.  We live in Michigan.  I might be able to take a picture of the one I seen(and killed) this morning in my laundry room.

Answer:

Pennsylvania wood roach is a native of woodland areas.  It is found throughout northern four season climates of the USA.



Baiting is not the effort of choice for interior roach visits.  They are quite sensitive to pyrethroid pesticides.  Permethrin, deltamethrin, and others of this class, can be used.  Siding, shake roofs, and wood piles are attractive breeding areas for these native roaches.  The young ones, and mature females are without wings, and resemble oriental roaches.  Mature males are with wings and have distinct coloration.  The following article is enclosed for your review.  If you wish, please contact me for further information Tami.





PENNSYLVANIA WOOD COCKROACHES


Parcoblatta pennsylvanica (DeGeer) 


Click here for 
Acrobat Reader Version
  


Cockroaches are among the most common of insects. Fossil evidence indicates that cockroaches have been on earth for over 300 million years. They are considered one of the most successful groups of animals. Because cockroaches are so adaptable, they have successfully adjusted to living with humans. About 3,500 cockroach species exist worldwide, with 55 species found in the United States. In Pennsylvania, only four species are common household pests. These are the German, brown-banded, Oriental, and American cockroaches.



The Pennsylvania wood cockroach is considered an occasional nuisance pest in homes in Pennsylvania. It is widely distributed in the eastern, southern, and midwestern states, up to Canada. This species can become a problem when infested firewood is brought indoors, or when it moves into homes from the surrounding woods.

Description and Behavior 



Adult males are approximately 1 inch long; females grow to about 3/4 inch long. Males are dark brown; the sides of the thorax and the front half of the wings are margined with yellow. Adult males are fully winged, while females have conspicuous wing pads (actually short wings like that of the female oriental roach), which are functionless. Wings of the male are longer than its body, while wing pads of the female cover only one-third to two-thirds of the abdomen. The males fly swiftly but do not have the ability to sustain themselves in the air for long periods.

Nymphs and adults (Fig. 1) are usually found outdoors beneath loose bark in woodpiles, stumps, and hollow trees. Brought indoors on infested firewood, they wander about the house without congregating in any particular room. They can be especially troublesome during the mating season, which is during May and June. Male wood cockroaches frequently travel in large numbers and fly considerable distances. They are attracted to lights at night and may gain entry indoors. Large numbers may also be found in rain gutters of homes.



Pennsylvania wood cockroaches feed primarily on decaying organic matter. Both female and male Pennsylvania wood cockroaches have been found under shingles and on the inside of garages. They rarely breed indoors. However, with the growing use of firewood, the popularity of cedar shake shingles, and the continual building of homes in wooded areas, problems with Pennsylvania wood cockroaches will probably escalate.
 






Figure 1.


Adult, nymph and egg stages of 


Pennsylvania wood cockroaches.




Life History 



The Pennsylvania wood cockroach has three developmental stages: egg, nymph, and adult. Eggs are laid in egg capsules, produced during the warm months and deposited behind the loose bark of dead trees, fallen logs, or stumps. Egg capsules are yellowish brown and characteristically curved on both sides like a half moon. Capsules are twice as long as wide, each containing up to 32 eggs. The egg stage lasts about 34 days at 80°F, while the nymphal stage typically lasts 10 to 12 months but can last up to 2 years. The normal life span of the female adult is several months.

 


Management  
 
Structural (and Environmental) Modifications and Repairs - Pennsylvania wood cockroaches are most often carried into homes under the bark of firewood. It is best to not store firewood inside the house. Move woodpiles away from the house to further reduce the likelihood of cockroaches wandering in.



Houses located within woods will sometimes have wood cockroaches crawl under siding; especially homes with cedar shake shingles. To cockroaches, the house may represent a fallen tree and a new location for nesting. A wide lawn will inhibit cockroaches crawling from the surrounding woods to the house. The use of window screening and caulking to prevent entry is a good structural tactic.



Chemical Control - As breeding populations rarely become established indoors, house interiors should not be treated. Treat exteriors only when wood cockroaches enter homes from the surrounding environment.



Exterior treatments to foundations, around doors and windows, porches, patios and other areas where outside lights are located will help control both the adult males (which will fly to the lights) and the females (which crawl to the house in search of harborage). Use only products manufactured and approved for this purpose and carefully follow the instructions on the labels. Do not use chemicals in areas where small children and pets may come in contact with them. Avoid getting spray on sensitive vegetation. For persistent and difficult-to-treat infestations, contact a professional pest-control service.




Warning  



Pesticides are poisonous. Read and follow directions and safety precautions on labels. Handle carefully and store in original labeled containers out of the reach of children, pets, and livestock. Dispose of empty containers right away, in a safe manner and place. Do not contaminate forage, streams, or ponds.



*** Disclaimer ***



Authored by: Steve Jacobs, Sr. Extension Associate



April 2002


Revised May 2007



© The Pennsylvania State University 2007


This publication is available in alternative media on request.


Penn State is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity, and the diversity of its workforce.



The best to you,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist
American Pest Solutions
Pest Control Chicago

Question IF you look at animals such as shrimp, lobsters, crayfish, crabs, scorpions, cockroaches, etc they are all cousins to each other in the animal kingdom. I can look at all of these animals and not think much of them. But why is it that when I see a cockroach, just the sight of one wants to make me vomit? Those things are so disgusting... even though they are harmless and do not bite or attack humans (unlike their cousins, they are actually more scared of us than we are of them) But the roach just gives me a disgusted feeling of utter revulsion and goosebumps all over my body. Any clues as to why this is? Could it be that a cockroach is linked to poor hygiene? Answer You are asking an interesting question. I will draw from my own observations. Have you ever watched a Praying(Preying)Mantis turn its head to follow your movements, while the rest of the body remained motionless? As a youngster, I did get an eerie feeling that the critter was watching my every movement---almost human-like behavior to me. The cockroach will also watch you in certain instances, in the same way moving its head to follow your movement. Of course, with a sudden quick move, you'll cause the critter to run. Since they appear as if from nowhere, one can get the feeling that roaches, as invaders, hold some power over one, since they come and go as they like. When you look for them, they may be displaying their antennae only, waving, to and fro, as the rest of the body remains hidden in a crack or crevice. The mere fact that they can multiply in increasing numbers, partake of your food supply, defecate anywhere, can gross someone out. How about their ability to be a vector of microscopic disease organisms? I once visited a Florida trailer park. I noticed that all the children living in one particular trailer home were without eyelashes, and eyebrows; entering the home, pushing open the screen door, caused thousands of roaches to move out of the way. I soon discovered that every conceivable crack, crevice, and void was occupied by roaches. The ones on the floor were not able to hide since all areas were already occupied by their fellow roaches. With that, I knew that the roaches had eaten the lashes and eye brows of the children living in that trailer. I hope to not have contributed to further "creep-out", but you just set me up to write this. thanks to you, it will now be available for the World to read. If I can be of any positive help, please let me know. Best wishes, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com

 

Expanded Question:

hello, im completely disgusted to come home from out of town to find a roach crawling on the floor. Im pretty clean. I have tile floor throughout the house and I mop on a regular basis. there are no cracks and crevices but i wonder where could it have came from. I have lived at this place since January 1 and today was my first roach experience. can u perhaps tell me how else it came and what to do to prevent more. P.S the pest man is coming tuesday. I stay in an apartment and they are also spraying for pests on the outside.

Answer:

It would help me to know in what part of the Country you live.



Depending on the species, various introductions of roaches are common-place.  some species can enter directly from your sewer connections, others can enter from the outside, where they live in their natural surroundings, and also, they can enter from other units of your building.  They can also be introduced by carrying them home in groceries or other shopped products.



Sometimes roaches can appear when other units are treated, but the roaches that have not contacted the pesticide, move away through plumbing accesses, etc.



See what happens after the exterminating company arrives.  The technicians should be able to tell you what specie they are addressing.  If there are several species concerned, they will tell you.



For further assistance, you can reach me at our e-mail address listed below.



Best wishes ERA,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

Pest Control Chicago
American Pest Solutions

Expanded Question:

I have contacted a few (licensed, legal) pest control firms in the area about a problem I have been having with Stink bugs.  Most have recommended sprays and similar forms of "contact treatments" that don't always work, according to them.



One firm recommended placing a block that emits something which repels and/or kills Stink bugs into my attic.  He said that it was not highly dangerous to humans and is made for this purpose.  He mentioned that this "block" is used where a normal spray could not be used.



Does this sound familiar to you?  It is intriguing to me because only two firms had any suggestion for treating the problem area (attic) rather than just spraying around the perimeter of the basement.



Any idea what this "block" could be?  He said it is 4 inches by 12 inches and looks like cardboard.



Thanks!


Mark


Answer:

Dichlorvos, 2,2-Dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate is an active ingredient in some plastic strips that are designed for hanging in certain situations where volume applications of this product will kill invading invertebrate species.  This pesticide is known as DDVP, and is an organophosphate.  Your description of size leads me to this suggested conclusion.

A ready to use strip trademarked as Insect Guard, which is labeled to kill flying and crawling pests, can be purchased from a pest control supplier.  It is recommended to use one strip per 900 to 1200 cubic feet.  Attic use is an appropriate location to use this product.  Determine the total volume of that space to determine the number of strips required.



To my knowledge, this is the only item that fits your inquiry. Don't you think that contacting the companies that recommended a block-like material that is used to kill stinkbugs would net you a detailed explanation?



Please look up my  answers to several inquirers about stinkbugs.  I believe you will get some guidance from those responses. The allexpert site retains all answers per expert, and you can scroll down the answers to locate those that will interest you.

Briefly, these are the control aspects of stinkbug invasion: 

 

1) At minimum, fan spray the entire surface of west and south side of your house with a long-lasting pyrethroid such as Deltamethrin or Permethrin for example.  Do so in mid-September, and no later than the first week of October.  A single treatment is sufficient.

 

2) If possible seal all cracks and crevices as an added deterrent to entry by these over-wintering bugs.

 

3) Consider that if the bugs have entered the home's walls, that killing them then can bring you secondary pest problems with scavenger insects such as carpet beetles, and larder beetles, etc.

 

4) When seeing stinkbugs in Winter, they are driven out by the heat from the fireplace in use, or a 60 degree winter day, where the sun is beating down on west or south exterior walls where the bugs have collected during hibernation.  Rather than spraying them then, vacuum them up.  In the spring, when they appear, they want to exit their wintering locations, and can appear by the numbers.  Again, vacuum, do not spray.



I hope that this response will help you.  You can find a pest control supplier linked to our website.



Good luck and best wishes Mark,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

Pest Control Chicago,
American Pest Solutions

Abatement Suggestion from Pro


Hi George,

I have contacted a few (licensed, legal) pest control firms in the area about a problem I have been having with Stink bugs.  Most have recommended sprays and similar forms of "contact treatments" that don't always work, according to them.

One firm recommended placing a block that emits something which repels and/or kills Stink bugs into my attic.  He said that it was not highly dangerous to humans and is made for this purpose.  He mentioned that this "block" is used where a normal spray could not be used.

Does this sound familiar to you?  It is intriguing to me because only two firms had any suggestion for treating the problem area (attic) rather than just spraying around the perimeter of the basement.
Any idea what this "block" could be?  He said it is 4 inches by 12 inches and looks like cardboard.

Thanks!
Mark
 
Dichlorvos, 2,2-Dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate is an active ingredient in some plastic strips that are designed for hanging in certain situations where volume applications of this product will kill invading invertebrate species.  This pesticide is known as DDVP, and is an organophosphate.  Your description of size leads me to this suggested conclusion.

A ready to use strip trademarked as Insect Guard, which is labeled to kill flying and crawling pests, can be purchased from a pest control supplier.  It is recommended to use one strip per 900 to 1200 cubic feet.  Attic use is an appropriate location to use this product.  Determine the total volume of that space to determine the number of strips required.

To my knowledge, this is the only item that fits your inquiry. Don't you think that contacting the companies that recommended a block-like material that is used to kill stinkbugs would net you a detailed explanation?

Please look up my  answers to several inquirers about stinkbugs.  I believe you will get some guidance from those responses. The allexpert site retains all answers per expert, and you can scroll down the answers to locate those that will interest you.

Briefly, these are the control aspects of stinkbug invasion:

1) At minimum, fan spray the entire surface of west and south side of your house with a long-lasting pyrethroid such as Deltamethrin or Permethrin for example.  Do so in mid-September, and no later than the first week of October.  A single treatment is sufficient.

2) If possible seal all cracks and crevices as an added deterrent to entry by these over-wintering bugs.

3) Consider that if the bugs have entered the home's walls, that killing them then can bring you secondary pest problems with scavenger insects such as carpet beetles, and larder beetles, etc.

4) When seeing stinkbugs in Winter, they are driven out by the heat from the fireplace in use, or a 60 degree winter day, where the sun is beating down on west or south exterior walls where the bugs have collected during hibernation.  Rather than spraying them then, vacuum them up.  In the spring, when they appear, they want to exit their wintering locations, and can appear by the numbers.

Again, vacuum, do not spray.

I hope that this response will help you.  You can find a pest control supplier linked to our website, pestproblemssolved.com.

Best wishes,


George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

 

stinkbugs in Delaware


I just read the letter sent to you by Kyle in Pennsylvania, and I've got the same problems with stink bugs in nearby Delaware.  Can you please send me the letter you wrote on same subject last December?  Thanks.  I have contacted our pest control people (with whom we have an annual contract for control of pests), and they told me that stink bugs are not included!  How can I get rid of these little beasts?  Help!
 


Greetings Barbara--

I'm enclosing the answer mailed to Ikammer, and to which I directed Kyle.

flying insect 


Question:  QUESTION: I live in northern new jersey. These bugs are octagon shaped with four legs.They lift the bug off the ground.Very thin but hard bodies. Very hard to kill(even don't drown) and stink.Like the warmth and come in all the time in summer.I think they get dormant in the cold.Need to know how to kill them. They show up everywhere.

ANSWER: Hello Ifkammer

You seem to be talking about a true Stinkbug.  There are many specie and they all belong to a family of bugs known as Pentatomidae.  Pentatomids exude a strong odor which , when left on surfaces within walls or a house or inside, will continue to attract these creatures year after year.  Talk to a garden supplier about outdoor spraying of fruit trees and plants.  Stink bugs will cause major crop damage when left unchecked. 

They want to over-winter in warm protected places and will find ways to enter a house particularly from the South and West side of the building.  Window framing and entire siding can be sprayed with Cypermethrin in the late summer-early Fall.  Missing these opportunities, spray interior with Baygon spray, using a fine mist by pumping a sprayer until pumping becomes difficult.  Set the nozzle;e to fan or cone spray so that only a fine mist is released.  Spray walls, window sills, door framing, etc.  Use an insecticide called Deltamethrin in its powder formula.  Apply to cracks and voids with a hand duster such as a Getz duster or a Centro bulb.  Applying this material in window casings and other voids that these insects can reach will be very helpful.

Remember, you have to start somewhere, so there is no time like the present to begin.

Good luck,

PS:  If I've been helpful, I'd appreciate your filling out your comments where that response is available to you.

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

 

QUESTION: Two questions:

1. Is the pest control industry anywhere near a chemical or biological  control for the BMSB?

2. Should I powerspray my house to cover the siding to prevent aggregation?  How about a powder under the siding?

Any advice is useful because I have these awful creatures...Thanks

Jim

ANSWER: The onset of Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs is of recent time.  They were imported from Asia; probably Korea or China via shipping containers.  They are spreading throughout the East Coast, first noticed in Eastern Pennsylvania.  Oregon has reported this pest also.
At this time, they are not a serious pest of crops; however, they may eventually become a serious agricultural pest.

Chemical controls will be with a pyrethroid such as Deltamethrin as a liquid which should be applied to the entire west and southside of the home's exterior, and topically along cracks and crevices from roof to foundation elsewhere.  Include vents in your prevention.  This spraying should not be done before mid-September, in my opinion.

Currently, you would be seeing BMSB exiting from their over-wintering sites.  Vacuum inside as they appear and, if you like, sprat outside to reduce the next cycle of bugs.

As to in wall treatment, caution should be exercised as not to kill in wall voids during winter.  The resulting kill will attract scavenger critters such as carpet beetles, and larder beetles, as well as a host of ants, and maybe certain mite specie.

As regards biological controls; there is research in progress.  You might contact the University of Ohio, since they are beginning a research project, I think.

Pheromone traps are currently under way, but I have no information regarding any availability at this juncture.

As regards powder under the siding where you suspect easy access; you can apply DeltaDust in the Fall as an adjunct to your Deltamethrin spraying with Suspend SC.  The dust is also Deltamethrin.

Best wishes, and let me hear from you as to your success Jim,

George Manning
Consulting Entomologist
www.pestproblemssolved.com

 

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

 

QUESTION: thank you for your response.

 

What you are saying is that I should not apply any insecticides until the Fall?

 

Also, should I spray attic vents, soffits and chimney?  It seems like these things can get in anywhere?  


Answer
An experience level is helpful.  If you attempt to treat every possible area, you will have difficulty discovering the necessary applications.  I like to try south and west side, and any sun-soaked surfaces first.  I do believe that color of surfaces could enhance or detract from stinkbug egress to your home's interior.  This is only an observation.

 

Correct, wait for Late September to spray the exterior surfaces of the home.  In the meantime, you can seal cracks and crevices around windows, doors, etc.

 

Best wishes Jim,

 

George Manning
Consulting Entomologist

 

Hi- I know you have answered brown marmorated stinkbug questions before but hoping you have more info now.  We are badly invaded for the third year in a row now, have them year round.  Especially bad in the fall.  I have tried to seal evrything I can, but they are already inside, I guess.  Would putting borax or diatamacious earth around my windowsills and perimeter of my house help?  I have terminex, but those idiots (here, anyway) cant even identify the bug.  I had to send it to Rutgers.  Terminex cant seem to solve the problem.  I have cats and kids, so dont want to use heavy chemicals inside the home, but we CANT STAND THESE DAMN BUGS (10-20 a day)

Any help would be MOST welcome!!!!!

Answer
Over wintering arthropods are a huge subject in general.  Depending on the available pesticides that have a long enough residual efficacy to help you through the migration of BMSB, provides a chance to be effective in your effort to protect your home from these smelly and obnoxious invaders.

Standard, cutting edge protection requires that you apply a pyrethroid labelled for out door use to all surfaces on the south and west sides of your home.  This includes roof/gutter line and soffiting above the parapet wall, bay windows, doors; even the base of a vinyl exterior at the base above the foundation wall, and window wells plus the HVAC line through the exterior wall.  An extra touch could be roof vents and dormers with these directional exposures.

I have ideas that currently are not commercially available, which I plan to make public after test trials.  Should you want to sign up for field test trials; next year, after patent protections, I will be looking for individuals that will allow these trials on their properties/homes.

As for now, I want to caution you not to go all out with indoor killing within wall voids, etc.  The resulting carnage will certainly attract a later introduction of various scavenger specie that can be present as an added pest problem as they populate the home.

You must begin your fight immediately, and apply pesticide weekly to 10 day intervals throughout  remaining days of September and through the 15th of November; my opinion.

Use a vacuum to get rid of those that wind up in the home this winter; again in the Spring as they attempt to exit walls to escape to the exterior, but wrongly find their way inside.

Best wishes Susan,

George Manning
Consulting Entomologist
www.pestproblemssolved.com

Ifkam


Flying Insects
I live in northern new jersey. These bugs are octagon shaped with four legs. They lift the bug off the ground. Very thin but hard bodies. Very hard to kill( even don't drown) and stink. Like the warmth and come in all the time in summer. I think they get dormant in the cold. Need to know how to kill them. They show up everywhere.

Hello Ifkam
You seem to be talking about a true Stinkbug.  There are many specie and they all belong to a family of bugs known as Pentatomidae.  Pentatomids exude a strong odor which , when left on surfaces within walls or a house or inside, will continue to attract these creatures year after year.  Talk to a garden supplier about outdoor spraying of fruit trees and plants.  Stink bugs will cause major crop damage when left unchecked.  

They want to over-winter in warm protected places and will find ways to enter a house particularly from the South and West side of the building.  Window framing and entire siding can be sprayed with Cypermethrin in the late summer-early Fall.  Missing these opportunities, spray interior with Baygon spray, using a fine mist by pumping a sprayer until pumping becomes difficult.  Set the nozzlee to fan or cone spray so that only a fine mist is released.  Spray walls, window sills, door framing, etc.  Use an insecticide called Deltamethrin in its powder formula.  Apply to cracks and voids with a hand duster such as a Getz duster or a Centro bulb.  Applying this material in window casings and other voids that these insects can reach will be very helpful.

Remember, you have to start somewhere, so there is no time like the present to begin.

Good luck, George
American Pest Solutions
Pest Control Chicago

Question:

How do I kill and control them in my garden? I live in Delaware and last year my squash and zucchini plants were overrun and destroyed.  They multiplied so fast. Please help! 

Answer:

A combination of actions will help you attack this stinkbug problem.  The use of a product known as Neem, will be a significant aid in combating these pests on fruits and vegetables.  



It is important to remove all weed growth near and around the garden spot.  Destroy rubbish where these bugs can hide during winter.  During the growing season, during very early morning, when the bugs are resting and slow-moving, hand pick them off of leaves and fruits.



Since these bugs have mouth parts developed for piecing and sucking, you can use a soap solution to spray the undersides of leaves before plants reach maturity as an overall program to cut back on bug and other plant damage creatures such as aphids and whitefly.  The use of diatomaceous earth, a dust, is extremely useful.  Read labels for garden application.

I have not used EcoPCO Exempt for outdoor use in gardens but I believe that this is a viable and safe addition to your arsenal of safe pesticides to use in the home garden.




Neem:



Neem is a botanical insecticide derived from a tree native to the Middle East, where it has been used for centuries to control insects. One of the most desirable properties of Neem is its low degree of toxicity†it is considered almost nontoxic to humans and animals, and is completely biodegradable. It is used as an ingredient in toothpaste, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and other products. Neem products can be used to manage pests on vegetables, fruit, ornamentals, and lawns and can be found at many home garden centers. Neem has been advertised as effective or moderately effective for more than 200 pest insect species and some of the plant diseases, including certain mildews and rusts. Effectiveness, however, is variable and test results have been inconclusive in many cases. Because the products are relatively new, it is not yet clear how effectively the products control each of these pests. Generally, chewing insects are affected more than sucking insects. Insects that undergo complete metamorphosis are also generally affected more than those which do not undergo metamorphosis. Neem often works more slowly than other pesticides, and effectiveness is reduced in cooler climates. Neem does not persist in the environment and should be reapplied after rain. Neem has little effect when applied directly on insects, except in the oil formulations; most insects are affected only after consuming foliage that has been treated. Neem is most effective as a foliar spray applied periodically to new flushes of growth. On some species of plants Neem also works as a systemic pesticide, absorbed into the plant and carried throughout the tissues, ingested by insects when they feed on the plant. This may make it effective against certain foliage-feeders that cannot be reached with spray applications, such as leafminers and thrips.



To the end that you are accumulating information that will make you combat ready, I've passed on these thoughts.



You may contact me again once you have reviewed this information, and I will take additional steps to help you, the now learned questioner, George.

Best of success and best wishes,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

American Pest Solutions
Pest Control Chicago

Stink Bug (BMSB)

Question


Hello George,

I read an email or two that you had with a gentleman named Jim from NJ who has a BMSB problem and as of last week so do I and it is bad. I'm in Monmouth County NJ. Not more than 3 so far in the house but dozens outside on the house all over. I have learned a tremendous amount about them on-line tonight but seems the pest control company I have been using for many years seems to know very little about these stink bugs. They did dust and spray outside this week but only where they could reach. I don't think that is the answer alone. Shouldn't they power spray the entire house as you suggested to Jim. Otherwise if they don't land on the chemical it will do nothing, as they land and fly all over the house. It was suggestd on one site to dust in the attic, deltamethrin but then I read that when they die I could get other insects that eat the dead BMSB. What's your take on that? Should I spray cepramethrin(not sure that is spelled right?)outside all over the house? I have new siding, windows and a new roof and so maybe that is why few have got inside? Will that chemical ruin the siding or discolor it? They are disgusting and makes you feel dirty, especially knowing that they hide in the siding and possibly in the attic in the winter. My kids are a little scared too. What do you suggest exactly to do to get rid of them and off the house for good? I told my pest control company to powersray as I beleive you suggested and they said that is not feasable, not sure why. He said something about the chemical getting all over the tech and they don't want to harm their techs. Maybe I need to call a pest control company that specializes in this bug? How would I know if they are in the attic/walls? We had a few in the house last year for the very first time but not outside that we saw but starting last week like I said there are dozens on the house all day and I need to resolve this.

Thank you for your time and I really hope to hear back from you. Please email me at  or call .
 

Answer
the answer is treat the exterior of the house from gutterline to the base of the building using deltamethrin or cypermethrin now.  The residual time is not long lasting where sun will shine on the west and south walls.  You should treat several times before the end of October.  These BMS bugs will subside at that time.

The condition may be mild in some years.  We really don't have a good handle on all the onset or numbers threat that can occur at a given site each year.  The sun will shine mostly on the south and west side of the building and on roof vents and chimneys.  Treat these areas comprehensively.  You should inquire of the siding company, whether there will be a stain potential on their vinyl product; I think not.

These insecticides on the outside can be applied by the home owner.  They can be purchased from a pest control supplier, and the home owner can apply the pesticides.  A good two and a half gallon sprayer that will, when pressurized, reach all areas of the building with special emphasis paid to treating south, north and roof cracks, crevices and voids will help immensely.

Best regards,

George Manning


Consulting entomologist

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Expanded Question: 

Hi George,



I have encountered a number of small insects which a tree specialist told me were "stink bugs".  I live in Southern Pennsylvania and he told me that they were common in the area.  Do you know what type of insect this is?

The problem that I have been having is that they keep showing up in my 2nd floor bathroom.  Never more than one at a time, but they just keep coming back.

Because it is winter, I expected there to be fewer of them around.  Does this mean that I will have a serious problem when warm weather shows up?  Is there something that I should be doing to stop them from entering my home?  Are they dangerous for pets or children?  Lastly, do you think I need to contact a professional?  I am seeing so few of them, I would actually feel a bit dumb asking a pro to look at the problem for me.



Thanks,


Mark


Answer:

Stink bugs overwinter as adults.  Towards late September these true bugs can find shelter within the walls of your home, concentrating in west and south side walls, soffits, attic spaces.  From time to time as the walls are heated by the sun's rays, these creatures may crawl to the light.



Use a vacuum cleaner to suck them up.  You should not try to kill them within your walls.  There are probably thousands hibernating.  If you kill them, their carcasses may become food for carpet beetles, and larder beetles(both classified as Dermestid beetles).  Once the carpet beetles arrive, there can be further problems as they seek out different textile substances to feed upon.



Please search out answers that I have provided for others that are suffering, as you, with these bugs.



They will leave in the Spring crawling inside and outside.  Be prepared to such them up with the vacuum cleaner; preferably a shop vac.

In the Fall, you can prevent entry by spraying the house exterior in all the vulnerable entry points.  Think about caulking, which can be helpful.



Best wishes Mark,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

Pest Control Chicago
American Pest Solutions

Strange insect problem


Hi George,

I have encountered a number of small insects which a tree specialist told me were "stink bugs".  I live in Southern Pennsylvania and he told me that they were common in the area.  Do you know what type of insect this is?

The problem that I have been having is that they keep showing up in my 2nd floor bathroom.  Never more than one at a time, but they just keep coming back.

Because it is winter, I expected there to be fewer of them around.  Does this mean that I will have a serious problem when warm weather shows up?  Is there something that I should be doing to stop them from entering my home?  Are they dangerous for pets or children?  Lastly, do you think I need to contact a professional?  I am seeing so few of them, I would actually feel a bit dumb asking a pro to look at the problem for me.

Thanks,
Mark
 
Stink bugs overwinter as adults.  Towards late September these true bugs can find shelter within the walls of your home, concentrating in west and south side walls, soffits, attic spaces.  From time to time as the walls are heated by the sun's rays, these creatures may crawl to the light.

Use a vacuum cleaner to suck them up.  You should not try to kill them within your walls.  There are probably thousands hibernating.  If you kill them, their carcasses may become food for carpet beetles, and larder beetles(both classified as Dermestid beetles).  Once the carpet beetles arrive, there can be further problems as they seek out different textile substances to feed upon.

Please search out answers that I have provided for others that are suffering, as you, with these bugs.

They will leave in the Spring crawling inside and outside.  Be prepared to such them up with the vacuum cleaner; preferably a shop vac.

In the Fall, you can prevent entry by spraying the house exterior in all the vulnerable entry points.  Think about caulking, which can be helpful.

Good luck,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

Strange insect problem


Hi George,
I have encountered a number of small insects which a tree specialist told me were "stink bugs".  I live in Southern Pennsylvania and he told me that they were common in the area.  Do you know what type of insect this is?

The problem that I have been having is that they keep showing up in my 2nd floor bathroom.  Never more than one at a time, but they just keep coming back.

Because it is winter, I expected there to be fewer of them around.  Does this mean that I will have a serious problem when warm weather shows up?  Is there something that I should be doing to stop them from entering my home?  Are they dangerous for pets or children?  Lastly, do you think I need to contact a professional?  I am seeing so few of them, I would actually feel a bit dumb asking a pro to look at the problem for me.

Thanks,
Mark
 
Stink bugs overwinter as adults.  Towards late September these true bugs can find shelter within the walls of your home, concentrating in west and south side walls, soffits, attic spaces.  From time to time as the walls are heated by the sun's rays, these creatures may crawl to the light.

Use a vacuum cleaner to suck them up.  You should not try to kill them within your walls.  There are probably thousands hibernating.  If you kill them, their carcasses may become food for carpet beetles, and larder beetles(both classified as Dermestid beetles).  Once the carpet beetles arrive, there can be further problems as they seek out different textile substances to feed upon.
Please search out answers that I have provided for others that are suffering, as you, with these bugs.

They will leave in the Spring crawling inside and outside.  Be prepared to such them up with the vacuum cleaner; preferably a shop vac.

In the Fall, you can prevent entry by spraying the house exterior in all the vulnerable entry points.  Think about caulking, which can be helpful.

Good luck,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

Fleas


Hi,


We are having a serious problem with a flea infestation in our house.  We have one cat, but he never goes outside, so we're thinking we probably brought the fleas in on our clothes (we have a few dogs that come in our yard & there is a horse farm behind our house).  When we initially realized we had a problem, I called a pest control company, but before they came to spray, I washed all the bed linens, vacuumed the furniture & carpet, etc.  Two weeks later we were still finding fleas everywhere, so I went through the whole house & removed everything from the floors of the bedrooms & closets, all the toys from under my children's beds, & then got the pest control company to come back and spray again.  It has now been about a week and a half, and, even though it's gotten better, we are still finding fleas.  I wouldn't be so worried if they were just the little tiny black ones, but we are finding the bigger brown ones still too.  I'm about to lose hope that we will ever get rid of these fleas!  Do you have any advice on what our next step should be?  Thank you so much!

Answer

Oh, I forgot to add that my husband has sprayed the yard for fleas too.
 
Most professionals will use an insect growth regulator mixed with the pesticide of choice.  The approach must include spraying from  floor to all walls to a point 2&1/2 feet above the floor.  All furnishings must be treated, and stuffed furniture should be dusted with a pyrethroid such as Deltaguard, through the muslin cloth below the furnishing, in the tufting below the cushions.  As you mentioned, treating all closets including contents is also a necessity.

Let me recommend a non-pesticide addition to the all out internal effort you will be repeating.  At the floor below every window, place a pie pan or like vessel filled to the brim with water that has received two or three drops of dish detergent.  In so doing the surface tension(meniscus) of the water's surface will be broken.  Fleas, when leaping, will not be able to leap off the water surface and will drown.  You will get some idea of the remaining infestation when you see the number of drowned fleas.

Your dogs can bring in fleas continually.  If the exterior problem is not met with a broad spectrum pesticide treatment, your home and its animals can be repeatedly infested.

Maybe you left something out when you last treated the home.  Do you have a crawl space?  did you include the basement and other attached sheds, garages, and underpinnings of this building?

Lastly, where do you live?  Fleas are not abundant in Northerly climates until around the month of June.  Further into warmer climates, repeating generations of fleas will occur.

It is important to know their life cycle.  Eggs are not attached to the animals.  When laid, say 40 to 50 eggs, eggs fall off the dogs or cat and  the larvae hatch out and live on organic debris that they find over the flooring of the area where they emerged.  A complete metamorphosis, they eventually pupate, and remain within the pupal case until ready to emerge as fleas.  Vibration stirs them to pop through their case.  This can happen at once with lots of fleas appearing suddenly.  By using the IGR, the benefit is the fleas cannot mature and will expire as larvae before pupation.

You have mentioned larger brown as opposed to the smaller dark fleas.  I have taken your word for the belief that you are only seeing fleas.

If you wish, you can mail specimens.  There are different flea specie.

It might be useful for me to identify the different individuals you have caught.

Let me hear from you again.

Best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com


Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Thank you so much for getting back to me so quickly.  I am sure the bigger ones are fleas too because they look exactly like pictures of fleas I've looked up on the internet & the pest control guy saw them too.  He did use an IGR both times he sprayed, and he sprayed our couches/chairs both times, the bottoms of our furniture, my son's mattress (which was where our cat liked to sleep), all over our carpets & big area rugs, along the baseboards of our hardwood & tile areas; we even turned over our couch and sprayed up in there because we noticed the cat had torn a hole in the lining and was getting up in there to hide.  We don't have a basement, only an attic, and the pest control guy sprayed our attached garage too.  I am finding a few dead ones here and there, so I know it's working to an extent, but I don't understand why I'm still finding bigger ones still alive.  The fleas were bad enough in the beginning that I couldn't walk on our carpet without getting a few on my feet or ankles; it's no longer like that, but I still find them when I sweep and in both my son's rooms (one is carpeted, the other is hardwood), plus we keep finding them in our bathtub.  Oh, and the dogs I mentioned earlier aren't ours and don't come in our house.  They belong to the neighbors and wander into our yard occasionally.  We only have one indoor cat.  We live in Biloxi, Mississippi, so we have our fair share of bugs & hot weather here.  Could these just be new fleas hatching that just haven't died yet?  Am I just jumping the gun & need to give it some more time?  We bought some Ortho Home Defense...do you think we should just respray the house with this?  I hate to keep using pesticides over and over in my house since we do have a cat and young children.  I would love to hear any other advice you might have.  Thank you again!

Question Okay,, I have a very clean house, and I have NO Pets, yet I keep finding fleas in my bathroom especially the jacuzzi bathtub. I spray and kill them and then clean jacuzzi out,, I even ran bleach thru cycles and the fleas keep coming back, I can't figure out how they are coming into my home and why they keep coming back even after I kill them. Help. the spray i am using is flea spray by ENFORCER. I even spray the whole bathroom then cleaned it,, still they come. How do i get rid of these fleas in my bathroom. thanks Answer If fleas are recurring in the bathtub after repeated spraying with product/Enforcer, you may be getting them from above a dropped ceiling, say, from a squirrel nesting source, or from a crawl space where certain rodents may be living, or cats or raccoons frequent. As regards raccoons, they, too, may be in an attic. Often, when there are canned lights recessed in ceilings, or vent openings above a tub or elsewhere in ceilings or floors, fleas may find your living area. Fleas can jump high enough to land in your tub. They may have more difficulty in springing out of a Jacuzzi style tub, since the surface is slippery. Place shallow pie pans at floor/window locations, filled with water that has two drops of dishsoap added. The slightly soapy condition breaks down the water's surface tension so that if fleas leap into the water, they can no longer spring off the water's surface, and they will drown. In this way, you may get a handle on flea locations throughout the home. Check below decks, attic, crawl spaces, back and front porches, window wells for small animal entry. I hope I've been able to help. In addition, if I receive a specimen, I will be able to I.D. the flea species. Best wishes Mike, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com American Pest Solutions

Wasps and Yellowjackets

Question
I have a pool and water fountain in Arizona (high desert) that has attracted dozens of paper wasps and yellowjackets. I've been killing the nests in the evenings (using a chemical spray) but they must be coming from a distance, since even after I kill off everything I can find, there are still dozens the next morning. Is there a way to poison the water with something that won't harm humans -- or any other way to get rid of them? I've also tried baited traps, but there are so many wasps and yellowjackets that the traps just make a small dent in the population.

Thanks!

Answer

There are pheromone baits available that will attract wasps. I have never used them, and so I cannot comment on their comprehensive reach such as you describe.

You might try using this home made construction, using mouse or rat glueboards as the sticky device to catch the wasps: An inverted cylinder of any material that will shed rain, passing through its apex (center) a length of cord from which is attached a glue board upon which is placed a bait attractant such as cotton soaked with grenadine, honey, maple syrup. In addition, protein such as a strip of bacon could be used. Wasps tend to move to carbohydrates later in four season areas; however, by you, the colonies will have more duel preferences throughout the year.

Place these traps on posts scattered at random, a distance away form your pool site.

With a little artistry you can make these constructs interesting and attractive.

I hope I've been somewhat helpful.

Best wishes,

George Manning
Consulting Entomologist
wwwpestproblemssolved.com

Expanded Question:

Hi,



We came home today to see, for the first time ever, bees swarming our front porch and coming and going from a corner  where two walls and the porch ceiling meet. 



We come and go many times per day by our front door so definitely would have seen them before. I put my ear to an interior wall and could hear buzzing and what I thought sounded like bees "bumping" up against the sheet rock. The sound was not loud, nor is the wall warm. 



Do you think we might be early in the infestation? Is there something I can do myself at this point to halt it?



Thanks much.

Answer:

Bees in your porch wall during the month of March, in northern climates, would indicate that they arrived last summer.  In western and southern climates having more or less four seasons, you may actually have received a new swarm of bees.

In the warmer climates, you may be experiencing European Polestis wasps or yellow jackets, or one of the other Vespid species.  If you don't know for certain, I suggest you contact someone who will give  you a positive ID.



Beekeepers may want the bees.  Before you attempt to destroy them, ask a beekeeper to have a look. Having removed or killed the bees,it is not a good idea to leave the empty colony.  Many secondary problems will occur, such as carpet beetles, larder beetles, ants, greater and lesser wax moths, and ants.  In addition, wasps and several specie of bees will be attracted to the site.  The pheromones remaining will attract future honey bee swarms; therefore, removal of the entire contents is important, and you will need to treat with an insecticide after this work is done.

If you catch a specimen, look up honey bees as well as the wasps that I've mentioned.  You will see good pictures that can help you to conclude that you have bees or some other species.



Get back to me with your location, positive ID, and I'll assist you further, if you like.



Best Wishes Mike,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

Pest Control Chicago

American Pest Solutions

Bees in our wall

Hi,

We came home today to see, for the first time ever, bees swarming our front porch and coming and going from a corner  where two walls and the porch ceiling meet.

We come and go many times per day by our front door so definitely would have seen them before. I put my ear to an interior wall and could hear buzzing and what I thought sounded like bees "bumping" up against the sheet rock. The sound was not loud, nor is the wall warm.

Do you think we might be early in the infestation? Is there something I can do myself at this point to halt it?

Thanks much.

Answer


Bees in your porch wall during the month of March, in northern climates, would indicate that they arrived last summer.  In western and southern climates having more or less four seasons, you may actually have received a new swarm of bees.

In the warmer climates, you may be experiencing European Polestis wasps or yellow jackets, or one of the other Vespid species.  If you don't know for certain, I suggest you contact someone who will give  you a positive ID.

Beekeepers may want the bees.  Before you attempt to destroy them, ask a beekeeper to have a look. Having removed or killed the bees,it is not a good idea to leave the empty colony.  Many secondary problems will occur, such as carpet beetles, larder beetles, ants, greater and lesser wax moths, and ants.  In addition, wasps and several specie of bees will be attracted to the site.  The pheromones remaining will attract future honey bee swarms; therefore, removal of the entire contents is important, and you will need to treat with an insecticide after this work is done.

If you catch a specimen, look up honey bees as well as the wasps that I've mentioned.  You will see good pictures that can help you to conclude that you have bees or some other species.

Get back to me with your location, positive ID, and I'll assist you further, if you like.

Best Wishes,


George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

Question


We have probably well over 50 wasps nests under the eaves of our home and our deck. There seem to be a couple of different types. We've tried everything you can buy and are wondering if our only other option is to call someone in to get rid of them. There are so many during the day they are now becoming a hazard.  Also I have recently seen on more than one occasion a large swarm of easily hundreds of bees swarming 10-15 above the ground. They are very loud, which is what first drew my attention. I've caught a glimpse of a something that was definitely not a wasp. The closest resemblance I could find was a digger bee. It had a small very round body, yellow and fuzzy looking, with a long pointy nose. Should I bee worried about this new bee? What if anything can we do? Whats attracting them to our house and yard? We live along a small creek bordering thick woods in Western Oregon. Please give me any insight you may have.

Thank you.


Wasps do not overwinter as a colony.  Fertile queens go into hibernation under mulch, behind siding, in attics, and many other protected places.  Each year, a new colony is started by a queen coming out of hibernation.  Where I work, in the Mid-west, this occurs in late April to early May.  No nest of the previous season is ever re-occupied; therefore, knock down all nests in winter so that you will not mistake an empty for a new nest.  The use of permethrin, a trade name is dragnet insecticide, is appropriate to spray in the eaves and other repeat nesting areas.



The buzzing of a large swarm of bees, and its sighting could be reported to the West Oregon Beekeepers Association, or the State Agricultural offices.  They can locate a beekeeper for you.  There are many beekeepers in your State.  You could locate beekeepers in the phone book.



If you are hesitant to spray for wasps, I'd recommend hiring a professional each year when wasps start to appear.  I am not familiar with seasonal weather changes relating to Spring, in your area

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


www.pestproblemssolved.com

American Pest Solutions

Question
I live in Chicago and have a problem with the black wasps living under my front concrete porch. They have been there for at least 3 years. I have killed at least two dozen of them over this time and have observed several more of them enter through a crack in the concrete. Recently they have been entering my basement from an undisclosed location since my basement is finished. I have tried sealing the crack in hopes that they would die but they just dug through. I want these wasps gone for good!

What can I do.

Answer
The blue black wasp is known as a mud dauber of the species Chalybion californicum, of a family of solitary wasps known as Sphecidae, commonly called sphecids. In cold climates it overwinter as a pupa within a clay-like mud tube.
The wasps that you see are completely non-aggressive, and won't sting you unless you handle one.

The blue black dauber , to my knowledge, will not build its own clay tube-like nest, but occupies a vacant one that was built by another species known as black and yellow mud dauber, Sceliphron caementarium.

Look for the mud tubes, and you will find the center of wasp activity.

You don't require an exterminator for the removal of a nest there are only one wasp per tube, and the wasp will not be there after laying its egg upon paralyzed invertebrate life stuffed in the tube for the single egg to develop into another wasp.

Another genus of wasps that prey upon spiders is commonly called Blue-Black Spider wasp, Family Pompilidae (Spider Wasps)
Genus Anoplius (Blue-Black Spider Wasps).

I don't believe you are referring to the later because of your description, and reference to their getting into the basement of your home. It would be useful if you sent me a specimen to identify.

The mud dauber types will stuff their catch into a clay tube that contains a wasp egg. As the larvae mature the captive prey is consumed. In the case of the spider wasps, the larva consumes the paralyzed spider, but most of these wasps will dig burrows in the ground or may inhabit a hollow of a tree, for example.

Please check below your concrete porch to see if there are clay-like tubes. These would be attached to the concrete surface. If these are present, we know you have mud daubers.

Spraying the underside of the concrete stairs with an insecticide known as Catalyst would keep these insects from setting up their habitat. In addition spraying the cracks and crevices of the exterior walls several times between May and June can prevent this condition from repeating itself or finding access to the basement.

The spider wasps would be difficult to locate. Should these solitary wasps be located, they too, could be killed off by spraying the surface of a ground burrow or other void that they may be using.

I hope I've been of some help; if you wish, you could schedule a visit with my office, since, we are a local Chicago company.

Best wishes,

George Manning
Consulting Entomologist
www.pestproblemssolved.com

Question
George, I have a bumble bee flying back and forth in front of my overhead garage door. Occasionally another will show up and as soon as they meet off they go, then three minutes later one is back.Never enter garage. They will fly around over the garage roof occasionally. Where is the likely place for the nest I wouldn't bother with them except my 8yr old plays there. Hope you have an idea. Thank you.

Answer
Bumble bees and a large Carpenter bee species look quite similar.

If the body appears shiny on the black abdomen, you are seeing carpenter bees, which are harmless, rarely forced to sting, and the female only stings when aggressively provoked.  Unlike the Bumble bees, which are a social society, the Carpenter bee is a solitary bee, making her nest in wood.  She will drill a round hole of 1/4 to 3/8 inch in diameter.  If you see such holes, for example, in the framing of the garage door, you will now know what is causing the holes.  These bees will often collect, drilling holes from the underside of railings or framing wood, etc.

Bumble bees seek fibrous material to make their nests.  I have seen nests constructed in compost piles, piled up cow dung, behind fiber siding, and insulation.  

Control can be applied with a number of different insecticides.  A non-toxic to human product, is a dust called EcoPCO.  Numerous other prepared sprays can be purchased for ready service to nest destruction.  In the case of Carpenter bees, treat the holes directly.  Don't seal the holes until evening so that you can leave the nest exposed for the bee's final return.  Our supplier can be found linked to our website.

I hope this answer is useful to you, David,

George Manning
Consulting Entomologist
www.pestproblemssolved.com
American Pest Solutions

Can't locate all sources of wasps inside home!

Question
My problem started two weeks ago when I started noticing wasps in my living room. Luckily they flock to the windows, I know they like light, and die pretty quickly and so far have not been aggressive. I've called a big chain pest control company who came and sprayed outside and inside. We've located one place in the crack of my front doorstep where they were getting in the house and also one space between the front door and flooring where they were flying in. However, these were not the only spaces, because after that initial spray - I left for vacation and when I came back - it was a wasp graveyard in my home!! I've had the outside source dusted again and now there is zero activity there, whereas before I saw wasps entering and leaving. However, I still have them entering my house from one of the vents in the living room - and I can't figure out what entryway they have located outside because I see no activity around my house whatsoever when I go outside and observe. Any suggestions - ideas?

Thank you!

Answer
As you realize, there are many species of wasps; likewise, there are many varied niches that will suite one species as opposed to another.

Typically, wasps want to be protected from the wind. Some will seek voids around the building such as soffits, attic spaces hollows of one kind or another. Others attach nests to building exterior surfaces, and still others will build their nests in the ground in one form or another.

That a vent is a point of entry is less likely than that wasps have built a nest in an exterior wall adjacent to a floor duct, so that their members will fly to interior light and become house-bound since they can't find their way back to the colony. Wasps and bees are able to locate their colony by relating calculating the sun's position as relates to the colony's location. Without the outdoor broad light source it becomes difficult to locate the point of exit that wasps have taken.

Wasps will not over-winter as a a colony. This year's new virgin queens will become fertilized and then will seek shelter below mulch, voids out of the weather, cracks and crevices. Except for a few species of polistes wasps, I am not aware that a last year's nest was ever re-occupied.

Wasps will crawl below vinyl siding to nest, attic spaces, below and within soffit spaces and vents. As the numbers grow, the individual wasps become more frantic to locate food sources. You see more of them towards the end of each season.

Caulking closed openings, spraying likely surface in late April and throughout the month of May, can prevent the settling in of new queen arrivals, preventing their nest building.

I welcome further questions, Viktoria,

Question i have wasps in my grill; they are building nests in the top of the grill. i want to remove them harmlessly, if possible. any suggestions? Answer Introduced from Europe in 1981, we think, , the European Polistes wasp, Polistes dominula, has spread throughout the United States. This is a yellow and black striped wasp, long legged, with an aggressive behavior, unlike its cousin, a native American species, known as the Northern Polistes wasp, Polistes fuscatus. P. dominula will look for sheltered spots such as you are experiencing under your grill cover. Left undisturbed, this species can produce several hundred female wasps, of which a dominent female will take over the roll of egg laying, while the sister wasps revert to work, and, in most cases will not lay eggs. Subsequent birthed wasps, all female, will work at gathering food, and nest construction, until Fall, when the queen wasp, the egg layer, will produce some male wasps, which will fertilize the females as they emerge from their individual cells, thus making it possible for fertile females to overwinter in protected places until Spring starts the process all over again. The common reddish brown paper wasp, P. fuscatus, will also seek sheltered spots, commonly more open than the European cousin. These wasps are not aggressive unless their nest is disturbed. They are not at all quick to attack such as is the European Polistes wasp. Their nests are usually a single slab of cells. You can find great photos of wasps by googling or yahooing European Polistes wasps, and other Polistes species. Simply, hose down the nest and allow the wasps to become dislodged from their home. I would not invest in an insecticide for this situation that you portray. Polistes wasps are excellent hunters and collect many garden noxious critters. Their nests are a single layer, where they may produce as many as 20 offspring. P. dominula, on the other hand, will only construct a singlr layer of cells, hanging from a spindle made from the same material as the construction material, a pepery wood, and enzyme mixture created by the wasp.

Expanded Question:

We live near Eugene, Oregon on 4 acres, most of which are conifer trees. Last year was our first summer here and we had a terrible infestation of yellow jackets. There were so many that we put out traps (yellow tube-like) and caught hundreds with the traps filling every few days. It hardly made a dent until the very end of the season. We have small garden areas that I can't tend, nor can we sit outside without getting chased by these very aggressive insects. We thought if we put the traps out early during late April to early May, we could trap the queen(s) and prevent the infestation. Unfortunately, we haven't caught anything though we've put over 10 traps on the property surrounding the house and areas where we caught them last year. When we tried the traps last year, the pheromone packet didn't seem to work, so we used various meats, turkey worked the best. This year, nothing seems to work yet. Now when I walk outside, I'm getting chased (though these could be bees), and can tell by looking outside there are wasps flying around. I can't tell if they are yellow jackets, however. I also see wasps collecting wood from our fence. Is it too late now to try to catch the queen before she starts laying eggs? This house is wonderful but the thought of staying indoors for months to avoid getting stung is getting me down. The nests could be anywhere on our property or one of the neighbors, all with acreage. What can we do to prevent these huge populations of yellow jackets?

Answer:

You describe your four acres as heavily planted in conifers.  You state that you have been seeing more and more yellow jackets and bees. These trees are the host plants of aphid-like insects that cover themselves with a white waxy substance which they produce while sucking the sap from these conifers.  When these insects, known as adelgids start appearing, they are vulnerable to pesticides.  Later, when covered with wax, they are not so easily killed.



Aphids are also attracted to the conifers, suck up sap, but don't do as much damage to the trees as do the adelgids.  If you mix a soap solution that can be sprayed over the trees in the early Spring, and repeat this performance several times, you might be able to reduce the yellow jacket/other wasp problems somewhat.  The soapy solution will kill the aphids and also the early, not yet waxed adelgids.

Bees and many wasp specie are attracted to the excretion from these small, sap-sucking insects.  Bees actually produce a honey from the excrement which is known as honey dew honey.  Both wasps, and bees consume this bi-product of conifer sap.  Ants also feed on the honey dew.  You may be able to see ants carrying aphids back to their colony where they store aphids, and milk them by massaging them so they release the honey dew.

Wasps and yellow jackets, which are also wasps, carry these small insects back to their colonies where other house wasps prepare the aphids and adelgids for the queen and larvae to consume.



I would think that after a few seasons, you could reduce the wasp population by combining the pheromone trap system with the soap approach.  See if the entomology department at the university agrees with my thinking.

It would seem that if the plant suckers are diminished so would be the wasps in time.



As regards these creatures chasing you, I'm not sure that this is a reality.  You are interpreting their attention to you as an aggressive stinging behavior.  These creatures are often attracted to prespiration, as well as perfume.  Unless you inadvertently squeeze one under your arm or under your clothing, they should not sting.  Wasps and bees sting for defense purposes only.  Should you find a wasp nest, and if you focus on spraying the wasp nest entrance, so as to prevent the inhabitants from flying out and stinging, you will not be stung by those members that are already flying and returning to their colony.  Those inside are programmed to defend, and those returning are programmed to bring home the groceries, and are not interested in you.



I hope I've been somewhat helpful.  It sounds like you are really living in God's country.

Best wishes Hope,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

American Pest Solutions

Pest Control Chicago

wasps
Question
We are currently having a problem with wasps. (We live in NJ) In Sept. we noticed the wasps going under our aluminum siding.  The nest got bigger and bigger as I saw more and more outside.  My husband hosed it with water and spent about $40.00 on products to alleviate the situation.  They are now getting into our house!  He killed 7 yesterday and 14 today!  He has been stung twice.  I am deathly afraid of wasps, bees, hornets etc.  Help! How do we get rid of them in our house?  And what about next year?

Thank you


Barb

Answer


Wasps will die before the cold season sets in; however, they can persist for a short while with the heat from the house keeping them from freezing.  The colonies virgin queens, newly mated, seek shelter behind siding, below mulch, and other protected surfaces.  They want to be out of direct weather, and do not seek heated locations.

In the meantime, the inhabitants of the nest will die, and this same nest will never be reoccupied again.  The access holes can be plugged so as not to invite future wasps that will build anew, but not within the vacated former nest.

Drilling a hole in the wall from the inside and spraying or dusting an insecticide into the area may do the job.  The difficulty is the insulation within the wall that can block access to the actual colony.  This might be a job for a professional.

Should you use a stethoscope to listen for the epi-center of the sound, or possibly just place your ear on the inside wall to listen for buzzing and scratching sounds, you might then place a wasp insecticide in the drilled opening that is small enough to stop the wasps from entering but large enough to accommodate a spray tube.

I hope I've been somewhat helpful Barbara,

Best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Wasps in walls of house

Question
I have wasps swarming around under the eaves of the second floor of my house. They are going in and out of a small hole and I can hear them in the walls of the bathroom. I am concerned that they may find their way into the house. Should I exterminate them?

Lynn

Answer
Depending on the interior construction of the bathroom wall, you could exterminate wasps a little later in the season. When the temperature drops, wasps may try to enter the home.

If they are not bothering you, and if they do not enter the home, leave them alone. They will not survive through the winter. Wasps do not overwinter in this part of the country. The current wasp queen will produce male wasps in the late summer to Fall. The virgin queens will be mated, and will over-winter below mulch, leaves, in building voids, etc. They will start new colonies in late April to early May, but never occupy the empty nest of the year before.

There may be exceptions with Polestis wasps. I have heard that they may use a vacant nest; however, I have not witnessed this myself.

Using Delta dust in the wall; pumping it thoroughly will show results, since dying wasps will be falling out of the exterior opening. This could be a painless way to approach this situation as a lay person.

A professional might approach the task from the exterior opening; there are various approaches for the professional.

I did not get into wasp specie; we are speaking generally here.

Best regards Lynn,

George Manning
Consulting Entomologist
www.pestproblemssolved.com

Expanded Questions:

I have used moth balls and those plastic hanger things but they are still eating my expensive clothes. What can I do?

Associated with the holes in your expensive woolens, could also be small moths occasionally seen near your stored clothing, or even flying on short jaunts around the home. You may have carpet beetles, which chew holes in woolens too. sometimes the shed skins of molting larvae can be seen near the damage.  the adults, small black beetles can be found on your window sills where they are drawn to the daylight.  


the larvae are fussy, mottled colored, and varying in size as they grow from one size to the next between molts.



The actual damage is caused by the larvae(immature stage of the adult).  Two specie, webbing, and casemaking are the clothes moths of concern.  The webbing leaves frass and fecal matter in its silk threads so as to appear somewhat bundled at the site of damage.  Sometimes this is uncovered by rubbing that spot.  Like the casemaking, the damage will be located under collars, in pockets, cuffs; places where the skin's natural oils adhere to clothing.  The casemakers weave a cocoon made from their webbing and fabric.



As a lay person, I don't recommend extensive spraying.  I do think you should send damaged, and, or suspect clothing for dry cleaning.



Treat these stored clothing using DDVP in the product known as InsectGuard.  Order a box of twelve from the supplier we are linked to on our website;pestproblemssolved.com.  You will hang these pest strips in your closets and, or storage bags.  When ready to wear clothing, allow several hours to air out.  Basically, the material volatilizes as a fine vapor and diffuses throughout the specific area of concern.  Residual activity is quite short-lived.



Good luck Steve,  Get back to me with your results or your further
questions.



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

clothes moths


I have used moth balls and those plastic hanger things but they are still eating my expensive clothes. What can I do?
 


Associated with the holes in your expensive woolens, could also be small moths occasionally seen near your stored clothing, or even flying on short jaunts around the home. You may have carpet beetles, which chew holes in woolens too. sometimes the shed skins of molting larvae can be seen near the damage.  the adults, small black beetles can be found on your window sills where they are drawn to the daylight.  
the larvae are fussy, mottled colored, and varying in size as they grow from one size to the next between molts.

The actual damage is caused by the larvae(immature stage of the adult).  Two specie, webbing, and casemaking are the clothes moths of concern.  The webbing leaves frass and fecal matter in its silk threads so as to appear somewhat bundled at the site of damage.  Sometimes this is uncovered by rubbing that spot.  Like the casemaking, the damage will be located under collars, in pockets, cuffs; places where the skin's natural oils adhere to clothing.  The casemakers weave a cocoon made from their webbing and fabric.

As a lay person, I don't recommend extensive spraying.  I do think you should send damaged, and, or suspect clothing for dry cleaning.

Treat these stored clothing using DDVP in the product known as InsectGuard.  Order a box of twelve from the supplier we are linked to on our website;pestproblemssolved.com.  You will hang these pest strips in your closets and, or storage bags.  When ready to wear clothing, allow several hours to air out.  Basically, the material volatilizes as a fine vapor and diffuses throughout the specific area of concern.  Residual activity is quite short-lived.

Good luck Steve,  Get back to me with your results or your further
 questions.

Best Wishes,


George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

Indian Meal Moths

Question
i have indian meal moths ( identified by an entomologist)in my second floor bedroom and hallway. There is NO FOOD upstairs. The house has been bombed and sprayed numerous times.this is a private home with a finished basement first and second floor. The kitchen has no signs of moths and all the food in the kitchen has been checked for infestation. It has been suggested that the moths may be living on food in the walls of the house,and entering the bedroom through cracks in the walls. If this is the case, how would i go about finding the source, and any other suggections where the source can be?
Any insights or experience with this kind of problem would be appreciated
karen

Answer
Indian Meal Moths can be in book bindings, bonemeal in the garage, grass seed, left over Halloween candy, mouse bait that has not been removed, ornamental dried flower arrangements. These are some of the remote, persistent sources. The more usual will be pantry items of a wide variety of foods; mostly processed grain based items.

There are pheromone traps that will now collect both male and female IM moths. Contact the folks at Insects Limited, Inc. in Indianapolis, Indiana; www.insectslimited.com/Issue%2055.pdf.

If you wish, you can place all packaged items in the refrigerator or freezer compartment. Those items that are staples, should be placed in Tupper ware-type containers. Should a meal worm/moth problem occur, you will know that it preceded the placement within the container.

Treatment with pyrethrins that are synergized with piperonyl butoxide will do an excellent flushing. For this aerosol treatment, you will not need to remove any packaged goods. The response time for insect reaction will be immediate. Remove all items from cabinets before using a residual insecticide; one of the pyrethroids preferred. Consult a supplier or use our's linked to our website at www.pestproblemssolved.com.

Karen, please contact me again if you have further need.

Best wishes,

George Manning
Consulting Entomologist
www.pestproblemssolved.com

QUESTION:

I have indian meal moths flying around.  I spot the majority of them in the living room.  I've also seen the little worms crawling up the wall in the fall.  CaN i CONclude that the food source is in the carpet from the kids leaving food around and it getting stomped on??



ANSWER: Dave---



I answered your questions the other day and was ready to send an answer when someone distracted me in my office, and I inadvertently erased my response.  I am sorry to have delayed your inquiry.



On my roster of past answers, I have written much about Indian Meal Moth(IMM).  



Don't be too sure that the moths are related to the food that falls to the rug by your youngsters.  There must be a reliable and constant food supply or other attractive substance that is drawing moths to sites within the home.  For instance, long shelved items may be developing webbing over their packaged contents.  You may have items left over from Halloween(nuts, chocolates gumballs, candy, etc), spices, cereals, flour, sugar, cookies, even bonemeal, and the binding in books can be a location for reproduction.  If you have pet birds, or just keep bird seed for wild birds, you could have transported IMM to the home.  These moths could have arrived on dried flower arrangements too.



When the larvae mature to the point that they move away from the feeding spots, they can be seen walking up walls.  They like to settle at the junction of wall/ceiling, top interior corners of cabinets, etc.  There they will spin a cocoon and go through pupation, after which they will emerge and start the process all over again.



You say that this condition has been present since Fall.  By now, you are experiencing the exponential growth of these nasty prolific pests.



Examine all food boxes.  Throw out the contaminated items, or when in doubt, place items in the refrigerator or even the freezer.  Purchase containers with tight fitting lids in which to sore your staples.  If these show larvae in time, you will know that the food stuffs were already contaminated.



Using a pyrethrum aerosol directly in cabinets that show contamination is allowable.  The pyrethrins leave no residual on surfaces that will endanger consumption of items stored.  I would be important to keep packaging closed while treating these locations.



The purchase of pheromone traps to catch moths will be useful only after you have initiated the kill program.



You are welcome to re-contact me when you have completed your clean-up program, and I can guide you further.



Best wishes Dave,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


www.pestproblemssolved.com

American Pest Solutions

For many months now, maybe since around Christmas, I have had a problem with what I think are brown house moths. I first noticed some maggoty caterpillars at the end of 2008 and now I keep finding them in the kitchen. They turn into tiny brown months. I keep finding them all over food and I just don't know what to do about them.



Please could you help???



Thanks ever so much!


Sandy

Answer


Sandy---



You are experiencing Indian Meal moths, most likely. I have answered similar questions and they are listed in the past question listings of allexperts.com. I will scroll down the log to find and copy one such answer for you.



There must be a reliable and constant food supply or other attractive substance that is drawing moths to sites within the home. For instance, long shelved items may be developing webbing over their packaged contents. You may have items left over from Halloween(nuts, chocolates gumballs, candy, etc), spices, cereals, flour, sugar, cookies, even bonemeal, and the binding in books can be a location for reproduction. If you have pet birds, or just keep bird seed for wild birds, you could have transported IMM to the home. These moths could have arrived on dried flower arrangements too.



When the larvae mature to the point that they move away from the feeding spots, they can be seen walking up walls. They like to settle at the junction of wall/ceiling, top interior corners of cabinets, etc. There they will spin a cocoon and go through pupation, after which they will emerge and start the process all over again.



You say that this condition has been present since Fall. By now, you are experiencing the exponential growth of these nasty prolific pests.

Examine all food boxes. Throw out the contaminated items, or when in doubt, place items in the refrigerator or even the freezer. Purchase containers with tight fitting lids in which to sore your staples. If these show larvae in time, you will know that the food stuffs were already contaminated.



Anna, foe expedience, I extracted the above information from an answer to a similar question. By all means contact me if you require further help.



Best wishes,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


www.pestproblemssolved.com

Using a pyrethrum aerosol directly in cabinets that show contamination is allowable. The pyrethrins leave no residual on surfaces that will endanger consumption of items stored. I would be important to keep packaging closed while treating these locations.



The purchase of pheromone traps to catch moths will be useful only after you have initiated the kill program. 



You are welcome to re-contact me when you have completed your clean-up program, and I can guide you further.

BIRD MITES

Question
I HAVE AN INFESTATION OF BIRD MITES IN MY HOME AND MY BODY. I HAVE MULTIPLE BITES AND STREAKS ON MY LEGS AND ARMS AND FINGERS. I HAVE MOVED OUT OF MY HOUSE - TO A ONE ROOM APARTMENT - WITH NO RUGS NO DRAPES (WHAT I CONSIDER A CLEAN ENVIRONMENT). MY QUESTION IS CAN I COME IN CONTACT WITH OTHER PEOPLE WITHOUT INFECTING THEM?

Answer
The drastic steps you have taken to remove yourself from bird mites is amazing.

Once bird nests are vacated, and no longer being visited, bird mite seek out any animal life. These mites are doomed to perish, and there will be no offspring. Northern Fowl mites will die out in several weeks without a meal. Even if they feed upon your body, they will not be able to reproduce, nor will they be able to live for any length of time on your body.

As to direct transfer from your body to another's; I feel that this will be unlikely to occur beyond the initial contact with the mites.

Chicken mites are somewhat more durable, in that they can persist for some time after feeding on their natural hosts. Still, even though mites can persist for a while, steps can be taken to wipe them out.

Pyrethrin aerosols followed by a pyrethroid insecticide, blanket sprayed over most surfaces will do a great deal to halt mite progress.

They will not reproduce inside; set the stage for you next encounter by keeping birds from nesting on your building.

Always follow label instruction. Keep in touch Gloria,

George Manning
Consulting Entomologist
www.pestproblemssolved.com

Angie


Bites


I moved to Central CA where there are cows/farms.  I get bit every night.  It seems like the same bites I would normally get in LA country  (spiders or mosquitoes)...big red bites....BUT I don't see ANY BUGS IN THIS HOUSE...None....It's a brand new rental house...There was a tenant with a dog here previously.  I was told they are not flea bites but stand alone big bites.  I have been wearing natural bug prevention lotion every night and then I do NOT get bit....I have to wear earplugs now becuase I bug went up my ear, but I killed it off with vinegar. I went to the ER and they said I got the bug out....So...I do occasionally see little tiny bugs flying about, but not often...Someone told me that tiny spiders may be hatching.  They don't think they are bed bugs because they bit in clusters...So anyway...WHAT DO YOU THINK THEY ARE?  HOW CAN I GET RID OF THEM...?  I was told spiders do not like 409 or Windex...I was also told MULE TEAM BORAX WILL GET RID OF EVERYTHING.....Thank You....

Dear Angie--

I've also had challenges, unexpectedly, to an allergic reaction to a sulfa drug.  Unbelievable, whole body rheumatoid aches plus chronic nausea. Today's my first opportunity to help you.

Bites in clusters indicate mites.  They may be mange mites, but whatever they are,  my home remedy is to dab kerosene directly upon the irritated skin, wait a few moments, and then dab on any regular motor oil.  Repeat this process after second day if itch persists.  You may feel like treating a third time but this is usually unnecessary.

I am not a physician.  Before you do this, please speak to your doctor, and, or pharmacist.  I am not licensed to prescribe dermatological aides.

The house was occupied by animals.  I'd recommend visiting a pesticide supplier, or ordering services to eradicate mites.

American Pest Solutions

Pest Control Chicago

Dear Mr. Manning:

Recently we have heard noises above our bedroom in the attic while we are in bed, typically between midnight and 5:45 am.  We believe these noises may be animals.  

Last week we climbed on a ladder and inspected the roof where it meets the gutter.  Except for one open space which we patched with flashing, we could not find any possible entrance for an animal to get into our attic.
We have Orkin come to our home every other month to treat for insects and other household pests.  

We live in the Washington DC area. Could you recommend  a solution to our problem and can you recommend someone to help?

Thanks for your help.

Sincerely,

Diane and John

Answer
Pteromyini, a tribe classified in the family of squirrels, Sciuridae, is made up of 43 different species.  They are commonly known as flying squirrels, and are certainly active between the night hours that you describe. They are persistent in their territory, capable of squeezing into almost invisible spaces.

They can be noisy when they become active.  My personal experience found them especially active at the 1 to 3 AM hours.

Raccoons are not in at these times.  Ordinary tree squirrels are not awake until 5:30 to 6 AM.  Raccoons may re-enter their abode, on occasion, during the late night, but always return before dawn, more often than not at 4 AM.

Question How can i get the squirrels out of my trees and keep them out Answer I have heard that aluminum pie pans hung at a number of locations from opposing sides of a tree,dangling from strong string such as fishing line or kite string might keep squirrels out of the tree. They should be hung high as well as from the lower branches. If you try this, please let me know of your results. I know of no successful method of keeping squirrels out of a tree other than continually trapping them. Squirrels are territorial. When an area becomes free of the existing squirrel population, others will soon drift into the squirrel-free zone. If the tree stands alone and far enough away from telephone wires, rooftops, and other trees, you can fashion an umbrella-like skirt which is wide enough to stop squirrels from being able to get around the skirt. You might try spreading Vaseline around the extremity of the skirt until the critters learn that they cannot succeed accessing the territory above the skirt. David, beyond these ideas, you may find a better way; however, this is the best I can relate at this time. Should you find another technique, I'd appreciate your contacting me. Best of success, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com Amrtican Pest Solutions

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