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Honey bees


I am located in north Texas.  I noticed bees under our RV, which has been parked for several months.  I found that the bees are entering through a space near the black water holding tank, underneath the RV, so I expect the bees are in the subflooring.  They don't seem to be the least bit aggressive. 

I have made every attempt to locate someone that might be equipped to, and interested in, salvaging the bees.  No luck. The expense of having an exterminator come from another town (none here) is prohibitive and I am seeking advice on how to do the job, myself. 

Before his retirement from Texas A and M, my husband was licensed to purchase and use toxic materials, so he is familiar with the need for selecting a proper pesticide and caution with its' use.  Please help!

Install a Porter Bee Escape at the entrance that the bees are using, making certain that there are no secondary exit points that the bees can use.  Purchase of the "Escape" can be provided by the Dadant Bee Supply Company, or Kelly Bee Supply.

Place a box or purchase a nuke from the supplier that contains five frame of wax foundation.  Place this nuke below the opening that the bees use so that those exiting will be attracted to the nuke because, once outside the hive, they cannot return to the hive.  After several weeks, the nuke will be full of bees from the hive.  At that time, you can either open up the subfloor and remove the remaining bees.  You could purchase a nitrogen cannister, placing the nozzle into the opening holding the Porter Escape.  This will freeze the remaining colony so that you can transport the balance from your subfloor.  After this step, spray the interior with Suspend SC, a pyrethroid insecticide.

You can then contact a bee keeper who will take the bees away.

The big concern will be the aftermath of your effort, should you not have removed every bit of honey and wax from the void.  Other pests will appear to consume what is left.  I mentioned spraying but first clear up the remains.

Good luck Cherokee, and let me know your results,


Consulting Entomologist

www.pestproblemssolved.com

george@pestproblemssolved.com


Chicago Pest Control

 

honey bees
I am located in north Texas.  I noticed bees under our RV, which has been parked for several months.  I found that the bees are entering through a space near the black water holding tank, underneath the RV, so I expect the bees are in the subflooring.  They don't seem to be the least bit aggressive. 

I have made every attempt to locate someone that might be equipped to, and interested in, salvaging the bees.  No luck. The expense of having an exterminator come from another town (none here) is prohibitive and I am seeking advice on how to do the job, myself. 

Before his retirement from Texas A and M, my husband was licensed to purchase and use toxic materials, so he is familiar with the need for selecting a proper pesticide and caution with its' use.  Please help!



Answer

Install a Porter Bee Escape at the entrance that the bees are using, making certain that there are no secondary exit points that the bees can use.  Purchase of the "Escape" can be provided by the Dadant Bee Supply Company, or Kelly Bee Supply.

Place a box or purchase a nuke from the supplier that contains five frame of wax foundation.  Place this nuke below the opening that the bees use so that those exiting will be attracted to the nuke because, once outside the hive, they cannot return to the hive.  After several weeks, the nuke will be full of bees from the hive.  At that time, you can either open up the subfloor and remove the remaining bees.  You could purchase a nitrogen cannister, placing the nozzle into the opening holding the Porter Escape.  This will freeze the remaining colony so that you can transport the balance from your subfloor.  After this step, spray the interior with Suspend SC, a pyrethroid insecticide.

You can then contact a bee keeper who will take the bees away.

The big concern will be the aftermath of your effort, should you not have removed every bit of honey and wax from the void.  Other pests will appear to consume what is left.  I mentioned spraying but first clear up the remains.

Good luck Cherokee, and let me know your results,
George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


www.pestproblemssolved.com

george@pestproblemssolved.com


Chicago Pest Control and Exterminator

 

honey bees
I am located in north Texas.  I noticed bees under our RV, which has been parked for several months.  I found that the bees are entering through a space near the black water holding tank, underneath the RV, so I expect the bees are in the subflooring.  They don't seem to be the least bit aggressive.

I have made every attempt to locate someone that might be equipped to, and interested in, salvaging the bees.  No luck. The expense of having an exterminator come from another town (none here) is prohibitive and I am seeking advice on how to do the job, myself.

Before his retirement from Texas A and M, my husband was licensed to purchase and use toxic materials, so he is familiar with the need for selecting a proper pesticide and caution with its' use.  Please help!



Answer

Install a Porter Bee Escape at the entrance that the bees are using, making certain that there are no secondary exit points that the bees can use.  Purchase of the "Escape" can be provided by the Dadant Bee Supply Company, or Kelly Bee Supply.

Place a box or purchase a nuke from the supplier that contains five frame of wax foundation.  Place this nuke below the opening that the bees use so that those exiting will be attracted to the nuke because, once outside the hive, they cannot return to the hive.  After several weeks, the nuke will be full of bees from the hive.  At that time, you can either open up the subfloor and remove the remaining bees.  You could purchase a nitrogen cannister, placing the nozzle into the opening holding the Porter Escape.  This will freeze the remaining colony so that you can transport the balance from your subfloor.  After this step, spray the interior with Suspend SC, a pyrethroid insecticide.

You can then contact a bee keeper who will take the bees away.

The big concern will be the aftermath of your effort, should you not have removed every bit of honey and wax from the void.  Other pests will appear to consume what is left.  I mentioned spraying but first clear up the remains.

Good luck Cherokee, and let me know your results,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


www.pestproblemssolved.com

george@pestproblemssolved.com


Chicago Pest Control and Exterminator

 

woodpile sawdust

I had four skyline locust trees cut down in the winter because their roots was damaging the patio. I stacked them up by the house for use next winter for firewood. Some directly on the brick patio, some on a raised platform nearby. I have been seeing a lot of sawdust under the platform and all around. Some of the wood have 1/16th inch diameter bore holes, with very clean edges. Are these also beetles?
 

Answer


It sounds as if you are experiencing the emergence of the honey locust borer from their galleries that were made below the cambium during development from larva to adult.  During emergence, the frass appears on a surface such as you describe.

This condition will not continue to recycle in the wood that you have stored.  These beetles will only attack live trees.

If I can help further please recontact me.

Best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


www.pestproblemssolved.com

george@pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control and Exterminator

 

woodpile sawdust-  honey locust borer

I had four skyline locust trees cut down in the winter because their roots was damaging the patio. I stacked them up by the house for use next winter for firewood. Some directly on the brick patio, some on a raised platform nearby. I have been seeing a lot of sawdust under the platform and all around. Some of the wood have 1/16th inch diameter bore holes, with very clean edges. Are these also beetles?
 

Answer

It sounds as if you are experiencing the emergence of the honey locust borer from their galleries that were made below the cambium during development from larva to adult.  During emergence, the frass appears on a surface such as you describe.

This condition will not continue to recycle in the wood that you have stored.  These beetles will only attack live trees.

If I can help further please recontact me.

Best wishes,


George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

 

House Centipedes How do I get rid of the House Centipede? I get at least ten of them a day. I can't take it anymore. These bugs creep me out, I want them out of my house. Centipedes are easily killed. They are nomads in that they do not return to a nesting area, but require a humid spot when resting, due to the fact that they dehydrate easily in an arid environ. Any household insecticide should kill them. If you place a insecticidal barrier along baseboards, pipe chases, and other avenues of travel, they will die. When you have stored lumber, and other paraphernalia in a basement, or a plaster and lath wall over a humid exterior wall, you have produced an ideal environment for centipedes to use as hunting grounds for invertebrate prey. As they seek out a live meal, they may run out in your presence. When they catch their prey, they paralyze the creature with their tiny fangs and then suck the living fluids out of the unfortunate creature. At times people have been bitten by a spider or a centipede; however, this can occur when one inadvertently squeezes one. Best wishes John, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com Pest Control Chicago

 

ticks


How do I get rid of disgusting ticks! Yuck!!
 

 


Answer


Natural control can go a long way in preventing ticks around your property.  Cutting lawns and keeping perimeter weeds and grasses cut will help.  Ticks climb up on grasses shrubs and trees and wait for a potential host to pass by.  Vibrations are sensed as well as carbon dioxide, both which alert the tick which will transfer to the passerby by dropping from tree or shrub or grabbing onto the individual passing through the tall grass.

Using Permethrin as a spray where ticks are likely to be waiting will add to the effort.

Removing vacant bird nests, mouse squirrel, and chipmunk harborages are steps in the right direction.

Use drione dust in cracks, voids and crevices within the home.  In addition spraying an emulsion of permethrin will add to your protection. 

Always examine your pets if they stray through fields and woods.  The use of pyrethin powder is extremely helpful in repelling and actually killing ticks on your animals.  I recommend that you consult a vet regarding long term prevention concerning tick transport on the pet.

Please contact me again if you require more specific information

Best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


www.pestproblemssolved.com

george@pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control and Exterminator

 

Expanded Question:

I live in northern new jersey. These bugs are octagon shaped with four legs.They lift the bug off the ground.Very thin but hard bodies. Very hard to kill(even don't drown) and stink.Like the warmth and come in all the time in summer.I think they get dormant in the cold.Need to know how to kill them. They show up everywhere.


Answer:

You seem to be talking about a true Stinkbug.  There are many specie and they all belong to a family of bugs known as Pentatomidae.  Pentatomids exude a strong odor which , when left on surfaces within walls or a house or inside, will continue to attract these creatures year after year.  Talk to a garden supplier about outdoor spraying of fruit trees and plants.  Stink bugs will cause major crop damage when left unchecked.  

They want to over-winter in warm protected places and will find ways to enter a house particularly from the South and West side of the building.  Window framing and entire siding can be sprayed with Cypermethrin in the late summer-early Fall.  Missing these opportunities, spray interior with Baygon spray, using a fine mist by pumping a sprayer until pumping becomes difficult.  Set the nozzle;e to fan or cone spray so that only a fine mist is released.  Spray walls, window sills, door framing, etc.  Use an insecticide called Deltamethrin in its powder formula.  Apply to cracks and voids with a hand duster such as a Getz duster or a Centro bulb.  Applying this material in window casings and other voids that these insects can reach will be very helpful.



Remember, you have to start somewhere, so there is no time like the present to begin.



Good luck,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

American Pest Solutions

 

Subject: identifying our new neighbors Question: hi there. i am writing to you from berlin, maryland (the eastern shore) and was wondering if you could help me figure out what has taken over our yard. these insects do not stand still long enough to get a picture or to even get a good look. i do know they appear to be mostly black, about an half inch long, and i must add there is a good size group of them. they are only out from about 10am-4pm and seem to stay away from the shaded parts of the yard. once the sun rises over the trees, there they are hovering the ground and flying sporadically up the young sycamore trees. i have found that as sporadic as they are, they have no intentions of stinging, or so it seems. we would like to have our yard back and were wondering if you have any clue as to what these insects may be. thanks so much! danielle Answer: It sounds to me that you have a wasp species flying about. Wasps come in all sizes and shapes. A common characteristic is their hovering over an area, and then darting elsewhere; or zigzag pattern flight movement. Certain bee species will act similarly. That they dart upward into a tree could mean several things. they my be social wasps and live in a colony, they may be finding an invertebrate food supply, or may be collecting sap or honeydew from aphid excretion My guess is that you are seeing solitary wasps or bees that move about in the fashion described. You should not have a concern about insect stings; they're only searching, and will not sting, unless, caught in your clothing, and are inadvertently squeezed. Their activity should slow down by late September-mid-October.

 

pantry moths & larvae How do I get rid of these? I had a problem with them last year in my cabinets and now there back again! Last year, I washed everything down, threw out contaminated food, and sealed up the cracks in the cabinets. I have the moth traps that catch the moth, but how do I get rid of the larvae that are eating all my pasta? Please help!!! Thank you Indian Meal Moths can be re-introduced in food stuffs, animal feed, or simply from outside sources. I'm enclosing a copy of a previous answer to a question that appears on my past answer list as follows: Subject: Tiny worms on silk in my kitchen Question: QUESTION: I have just noticed teeny, tiny worm like/caterpillar like creatures crawling all over my kitchen. I live in Pennsylvania. They travel on the surface of the cabinet or up a thread. The move like a caterpillar or a worm. They seem to be centered in the same area on the cupboards in my kitchen and I can't find them in my pantry cupboard. any ideas?? Thanks, Cheryl ANSWER: It sounds as if you have a breakout of Indian Meal moth larvae. They do spin a silk-like strand as they move over food substances. When they are ready to pupate, they will crawl upward to a corner such as where the wall meets the ceiling; and there, they will spin a silken case(cocoon). People often think these whitish cases are spider egg cases. You may have brought some food stuff in from somewhere recently. When they reach the age of pupation, and are over-crowded at their food source, they will often spread as you describe. I'm enclosing a fact sheet that can help you; however, if I've been wrong in my analysis, send me a specimen so that there will be first-hand identification at hand. Best wishes Cheryl DeRosa George Manning Consulting Entomologist george@pestproblemssolved.com Pest Control Chicago

 

Tiny worms on silk in my kitchen I have just noticed teeny, tiny worm like/caterpillar like creatures crawling all over my kitchen. I live in Pennsylvania. They travel on the surface of the cabinet or up a thread. The move like a caterpillar or a worm. They seem to be centered in the same area on the cupboards in my kitchen and I can't find them in my pantry cupboard. any ideas?? Thanks, Cheryl It sounds as if you have a breakout of Indian Meal moth larvae. They do spin a silk-like strand as they move over food substances. When they are ready to pupate, they will crawl upward to a corner such as where the wall meets the ceiling; and there, they will spin a silken case(cocoon). People often think these whitish cases are spider egg cases. You may have brought some food stuff in from somewhere recently. When they reach the age of pupation, and are over-crowded at their food source, they will often spread as you describe. I'm enclosing a fact sheet that can help you; however, if I've been wrong in my analysis, send me a specimen so that there will be first-hand identification at hand. Best wishes Cher George Manning Consulting Entomologist george@pestproblemssolved.com Pest Control Chicago

 

indian meal moths(?) Little gray moths about 14" in diameter. These things came in with some bulk cereal from the health food store. From there they contaminated some dry foods. Thence to the cat food. From there they got into some of my fly tying materials (feathers). For ID purposes let me add that in the feathers I found larvae: white, 2mm x 1cm, with a tiny protrusion at one end. So there may be a feather beetle in there too. Two questions: do I have one or two species and can I get rid of them by bombing the house and if so what product if not what to use? Thanks for you answers, Nick The Indian meal moths can be eliminated. Food that you know to be infested, showing surface of grains sticking together because of webbing, should be thrown out or preserved in the freezer by removing the top layer of stored food products first. Treat the food area with a pyrethrin aerosol spray to kill off the adults. Remove pupating larvae that are nestled where wall and ceiling meet. Examine all your food stock. Place staples in containers with tight fitting lids so as to protect from invasion, and to see if development of moths occurs inside containers that may have been contaminated prior to placing the product in the containers. Finally, use pheromone traps to see if moths are still present. If so repeat the aerosol treatment, making certain not to contaminate the pheromone traps. There are additional answers to questions about these moths in my list of previous answers to questions. You can scroll down past answers to locate them. Your question about little larvae found in your fishing tackle leads me to believe that you have Dermestid larvae, generically known as carpet beetles. These can be eliminated by using the same aerosol of pyrethrin. Carpet beetles are definitely attracted to feathers. I hope that I have been of service nick, Best wishes, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.@pestproblemssolved.com george@pestproblemssolved.com problemssolved.com Pest Control Chicago

 

Indian meal moths in my attic I might be able to stump you. I have had Indian meal moths in the attic for more than one year. I have a very reputable pest company and it took months to find where they are coming from. They have fogged (numerous times), sprayed my house (numerous times), crawled looking for a food source. They found some old rodent droppings ( the house was squirrel proofed by the former owners). They also took out some old wasps nests that seemed to be attacked by the moths but the problem persists. Nothing seems to get rid of them. The house was renovated 6 years ago by the former owners. A small part of the attic is not accessible. All my food is in containers and everything I own has been washed or dry cleaned and some clothing and articles are now in containers. This problem was even worse at the beginning since I was told by another pest company that I had clothes moths. It turned out that I had carpet beetles as well as the indian meal moths and they were responsible for attacking my clothes. It looks like they might have come out of the attic as well. I am a very clean and organized person. This problem has taken so much time and money and we are no further along. Would you have any idea how to get rid of these things? I am also afraid that the carpet beetles might come back.My pest company does not seem to know what to do anymore. And I am at my wits end. Please let me know if you need any more details as there is lots more...I hope that you can help. Thank you. OK Michele, I'll work with you----let's start: 1) Old poison bait or bait blocks in the attic, possibly in the soil stack area or at the eaves or scattered about. This could draw Indian meal moths, drugstore,and cigarette beetles, and carpet beetles. 2) Dead mice will draw larder, and carpet beetles, both of the dermestid family. You wrote of a history of mice, early introduction of carpet beetles could have swung to the baits remaining in the attic. 3) You can hang pheromone traps in the attic to draw moths. they'll get stuck on the glue. These days there are traps that draw both males and females to the glue. Contact Insects Unlimited in Indianapolis, Indiana to obtain such traps. Let me hear from you again either in answer to this communique or after you've probed further into the condition, given these suggestions. Best wishes, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com Pest Control Chicago

 

Getting rid of silverfish in my apartment


I have an infestation of silverfish in my apartment which is on the second floor in an apartment block and i just wanted to ask some questions regarding this infestation.

The first question i have is how did my flat manage to have this infestation of silverfish in the first place? As my apartment is not on the ground floor but two floors up?

My second question is i have noticed them at night as i have had this infestation for about 6 months now and i just wondered where their nest might be? As if i can get to their nest to treat that then hopefully i can get rid of the infestation completely.

And thirdly will i have to get a professional pest control company out to remove this infestation from my apartment or can i do this myself? And what sorts of products will they use? And can i buy these products myself and treat my apartment myself?

Many thanks.


Gordon
 


Silverfish are starch feeders.  They are not enamored with we places such as the bathroom tub; however, the pass along air flow routes, which could mean air rising in the plumbing wall.

The starchy paper of batting insulation can become veinated from their grassing over that glossy surface.  Numbers as you describe could have been introduced when a tear down of a roof occurred, releasing silverfish into an attic and subsequently, in time, your apartment.

Then too, silverfish are often introduced through the building materials that were used during construction of your building.

In much older buildings that converted from coal heat, residual silverfish may exist from the days that coal was delivered, accompanied by an occasional silverfish.  These are several scenarios, and there are many more.  Usually, we don't see large infestations such as you describe.

The use of a pyrethroid insecticide such as deltamethrin or permethrin can be helpful.  Borates such as Tim-bor or Borid can be 
helpful by dusting below baseboards, wall switches and other open areas where dusting is possible.  Entering the wall behind the disc that surrounds the drain at the wall and blowing dust in those voids is also useful, and finally, get the landlord to take care of this.  It's his responsibility.

Hope I've been helpful-

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist
w

ww.pestproblemssolved.com

Pest Control Chicago

Exterminator chicago

 

Expanded Question:

I am new to Florida, coming from the northern climate and have a question about our new 2 story home in central Florida. I have termite protection and have just hired professional lawn fertilizer/insect control. They were also offering an inside gel product process for a treatment in the outlets/pipes/etc leading  into home. Then a quarterly service on the exterior of the home to sweep away nests, webs, etc and I am assuming applying some sort of insecticide to the exterior. Do you feel this is necessary to protect this home and worth the financial investment of paying a professional for the procedure? If I should do it myself, what would you suggest I do? Thanks for your advice.


Answer:

Since you already have termite protection, you want to be certain that thorough inspections are done.  Regarding general preventive pest control, an initial thorough inspection which will define past and present vermin problems can be useful.  See how long you can live in your new home after a comprehensive treatment has been completed by a professional pest control company.  There are referral sites that list quality companies.  Angie's  List, and Checkbook are two good sources for referrals.



Rather than signing up for maintenance, see what you can do.  The professional inspection and single treatment can give you the time to evaluate need for repeat service.  You can do your own follow up work before you consider retaining scheduled maintenance.



Best wishes in your new home Lynn,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

Pest Control Chicago

American Pest Solutions

 

Insect Growth Regulators for fleas


I have an infestation of fleas in my house, and I have tried almost everything to get rid of them. I have heard that insect growth regulators are necessary because they stop the fleas from reproducing. However, I have not been able to locate any at the local pet, garden, or hardware stores, and I am reluctant to buy from an online company because I don't know which are best. Where can I buy insect growth regulator, and what types/brands are best?
 


Archer or Precor are the insect growth regulators(IGR)of choice.  They can be ordered from my supplier, should you not find a pest control supplier in your area.  Look up our website and find the company linked to our site.

Using an IGR with a product such as Talstar, Suspend SC, or Catalyst could be combination that would overcome your lingering flea problem.

Try placing pie pans with two drops of dishsoap stirred in the water, at the floor below every window.  You will soon find the pans collecting drowned fleas.  The water breaks the surface tension of the water's surface so that fleas cannot leap off the surface of the water.  You should place pans on the exterior of the house at door entrances to see if there is an outside problem too.

Fleas lay their eggs on the surface of dogs or cats, hence the eggs fall off the animal, and the eggs hatch into larvae that feed on the organic debris they find in cracks and crevices.  IGRs prevent maturation of the flea; however spraying the entire residence to a wall height of just below the window sill with that product plus an insecticide, while treating rugs, carpets furnishings, etc as well will prove successful.

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


www.pestproblemssolved.com

chicago exterminator

Pest control Chicago

 

Last summer we had a 60 gal shummard oak planted (Houston, TX).  This summer it has a weeping swollen wound on the trunk (2 weeks) Now I notice tiny (1/4 inch) white worms/larvae.  I also notice many small dry wounds on different area of the trunk. Today I poured some permethrium mixed with water on the trunk on the lower half of the tree. The tree looks healthy otherwise.  Any ideas as to what the pests might be and proper treatment? Thanks.


ANSWER:

There are so many insect invaders of oak trees, some more specific to red and shummard oaks.

Gypsy moth has defoliated at least a million acres of forest trees per year.  Look up Gypsy moth on google or yahoo for visual identification.

Are your tree's leaves looking different than usual; yellowing or smaller than usual or with varying sizes of mature leaves?

Insects can deliver certain diseases to a tree.  If infestations are great, the tree can struggle, and leaves will show variations in appearance.

Fungus that attacks the root system of trees that have had several years of insect damage can be weakened to a point that they become susceptible to wilt, a blight that can destroy a tree.

Cankers(lesions)in cambium are a result of root rot diseases brought on by fungi attacks that effect the tree's cambium.

I'd like more detail from you. The canker issue could be specific to your area.  The larvae that you describe, if moth larvae, could be Gypsies, which will often deliver diseases such as rot plus resulting symptoms such as bleeding plus, of course, defoliation as the season progresses.

Study you tree, give me a detailed description of the insect life that you see.

Let me hear from you again.  Sorry for the delay, I get swamped with work at this time of year Diana.

Regards, and best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------


QUESTION: I have not seen any caterpillars, but I do have a few leaves that show evidence some eating insects.  A few look like caterpillar damage and a few leaves look lacy.  Some leaves show signs of slight yellowing or browning on close inspection.  On the back of many leaves, there are tiny coppery fuzzy patches the juncture of the leaf veins. This is a young tree.  30 gal planted last summer.  From a few feet away looks healthy. Its trunk has doubled in size from last year and has gained significant height. But the evidence on the trunk indicates something is damaging the tree.  Now there are three locations that are draining sap. Many of the wounds are not draining.  The wounds are not round, they are irregular or scratched. Yesterday I treated the drip line area with Bayer Advanced Tree and Shrub. Most of the trunk of the tree is still smooth (young tree)so the wounds are noticeable and there is not many crevices for insects to hide in.
 


 

Answer:  Sometimes animal damage can produce lesions.  Deer, bear, raccoon?

Could old damage be there that you did not notice?

Blighting can occur at the root system as suggested.  There is a thing as too much water.  Inch worms can often be seen on the bark; whereas, they feed on the leaves, but are often seen hanging from a silken threads.

Various patches brown fuzziness and lesions may appear on the underside of leaves.  This may be the result of gall wasps, but that condition will not destroy the tree.

You may want to consult an arborist on this one.  I will look into this further if you wish; however, your State Foresters can be extremely helpful.

Thanks for the consult Diana--

George Manning

Best wishes,


George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

 

Expanded Question:

Hello.


I am having a problem that is directly related to my dog. For the past few monthes i have been dealing with an unknown creature(s) that have me infested. At first i thought that i had a flea problem but know i am beginning to think it's some other type of insect. just about all day and all night everyday (if i sit quietly) i start feeling these very little tiny things crawling on me and occasionally biting me. the areas of my body that are affected are mainly in my shoes and socks and my pants and legs. sometimes i will feel them on my face and in my shirt. judging by their movement, it feels like they are about the size of a grain of sand or a little smaller. everytime i go to look to see what is moving on me and biting me, i cannot find anything at all! i would take numerous samples of the affected area by using s piece of clear scotch tape and applying it to the area in hopes of getting whatever it is to stick to the tape. then i would take my handheld microscope and look to see and i still cannot find anything. i would take samples of my skin, pants, shoes, socks, carpet, my dog, and still nothing. no sign of any fleas or anything else that i know of or at least anything that looks like an insect or something with legs. i have tried many things to eliminate these constant pests or i would like to call them (little juggernuats of hell)! i have used flea bombs, 2 different types of flea killer sprays, 97% rubbing alchol, fire (heat), steam, washing all clothes, pillows and blanket with color safe, bleach, borax, salt, boiling hot water, and many other things i cant quite remember. the flea bombs worked for only 1 night then they came back. i even used 2 bombs that one night in one room (more them recommended) cause i need to sleep and these things are driving me up the wall. boiling hot water seems to work, but i am not too sure on that. for when i used so many chemicals to kill the supposed fleas, my dog would not be in my room. as i know, when i let my dog in my room, 4 days later i have this problem. when i go to do these things, i never let my dog in my room and it takes about 2 weeks for the problem to go away. i just recently started my dog on adavntage and when i took my dog to the groomers for a flea bath, the groomer found only 1 flea on him. so my dog is not infested with fleas and i cannot see any fleas that are crawling and biting on me. just what the hell is it? i have no allergic reactions that i know of and the affected areas do not show any rashes, scars, bumps, or redness or itchyness. also, many of my friends that i have told this problem to, think that my problem is all in my head. i strongly disgree. i have never had this kind of problem ever. what ever these bugs are, they seem to attach themselves within the fibers of the fabrics of my clothes and my blanket. can you please help me? tell me what i am dealing with here. i have spent alot of money trying to eliminate this problem and have done so much. many sleepless nights. i have ran out of options, that is why i am seeking an expert who can help me.
also, if you strongly believe that what i am dealing with is fleas, tell me exactly how big a flea is right when they hatch.


special note:


my dog is a beagle 8 years old and a male


i also have another dog that is some sort of terrier, but this dog nevers enters into my room.


thanks.


Answer:


"Paper Mites" 



Pin prick-like biting sensations, usually on exposed skin and often producing inflammations that resemble insect bites, can be a persistent problem in some offices. Occupants tend to blame these "bites" on some sort of pest infestation, typically fleas (which are extremely rare in office buildings) or "paper mites" (which do not exist).  Affected spaces are often sprayed with a pesticide in the absence of any evidence that insects are responsible. "Paper mites" are generally a cleaning or indoor air pollution problem rather than a pest problem. Only rarely are the specific culprits in "paper mite" cases positively determined, although there are often strong suspects. Shards of fiber glass insulation (such as from batting above drop ceilings), particles from both newly installed as well as worn carpet and carpet pads, and paper dust from separating forms and computer printouts along tear-lines are some of the most common proven causes of pin prick-like irritations. The dry air of many workplaces not only makes skin more sensitive to these tiny splinters, it increases the static electricity that is responsible for the particles "jumping" onto exposed skin (sometimes the static-charged bits are mistaken for living bugs). Any activity that stirs up accumulated dust, such as office renovation or the purging of old files, often leads to a "paper mite" outbreak. In cases where there is no obvious explanation, or multiple factors are suspected, an industrial hygienist may be called in to investigate. 



The Role of Management. The most common mistake of management in "paper mite" situations is to automatically request a pesticide treatment and thereby become liable in the event occupants experience adverse reactions to the chemical. The second most common mistake is for supervisors to dismiss the complaints of biting as total fabrications. Although there are cases where people imagine they are being attacked by unseen parasites, most bite-like sensations in offices involve a genuine source of skin irritation. The circumstances can be further complicated, since health care professionals unfamiliar with the "paper mite syndrome" frequently misdiagnose the resulting welts as insect bites. Others may believe that microscopic dust mites are involved. These are real organisms but cause respiratory distress rather than bites. Finally, it is normal for the coworkers of a person complaining about "paper mites" to develop a heightened sensitivity to their own skin irritations, often simply through the power of suggestion. Management must treat all concerned with sympathy and respect, but emphasize that pesticide treatment cannot be undertaken without positive confirmation that a pest problem exists.

Inspection. An inspection of the affected area should be carried out by a pest control professional who understands that pests may not be involved. Usually when real parasites are present, they are abundant and readily seen. The most common types in office buildings are mites coming from bird nests or from concealed infestations of rodents. Occasionally fleas living on guard or working dogs will bite people who work in the vicinity. If a thorough investigation fails to produce any specimens, a non-pest cause is probably responsible. Nevertheless, it is standard procedure to monitor the area with sticky traps. In addition, occupants should be instructed to capture anything they suspect is biting them on a piece of clear adhesive tape. The PMC will identify all such samples submitted from installations. Even a single parasite specimen is justification for pesticide treatment. However, the captured items are typically bits of debris or tiny, harmless insects that are commonly present in buildings. 



Inspection for Airborne Particles. When it is reasonably certain that there are no biting insects in the affected space, the pest control program is no longer involved.

Remedial Action. It is not unusual for a pesticide application to bring temporary relief to occupants with a "paper mite" problem. Part of the relief may be psychological, though sprays do settle irritating particles and decrease static electricity. Although it is unethical and sometimes illegal for pesticides to be used in this fashion, the same results can be obtained by legitimate means. A program of frequent damp cleaning, including carpet washing with water only, is often an effective short-term response while efforts are made to identify and eliminate the source of the irritation. Cleaning by vacuuming rather than wiping is not recommended; unless the vacuum is equipped with a HEPA filter, more dust may become airborne. Use of humidifiers or air purifiers can be of tremendous benefit if the affected space is not too extensive. It may be worthwhile for some employees to seek the advice of a dermatologist or other medical specialist, since techniques such as the use of moisturizers and the avoidance of harsh soaps are frequently prescribed to minimize irritation problems.



This review is from a non-recorded document in my files.  It is not authored by me, nor can I locate its author.



Let me add that there are often medical subtleties that do not get diagnosed.  Not being a physician, and being an entomologist, does not give me license to practice medical advice.  I can talk from past experience when I suggest that thyroid imbalance can sometimes mimic bites as well as side effects from drug therapy.



I hope that I've been helpful. 

If you wish, follow up with me so that I can know of your progress.



Best wishes Gary,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

Pest Control Chicago,

American Pest Solutions

 

Invasion of Knats in Home


We've just built a straw bale house in a wooded area of northern VT. It's plastered with stucco both inside and out.   With the onset of hot humid weather  what I believe to be gnats (very small black flying bugs) have appeared around the windows and seem to cluster where the walls meet the ceiling.  They walk/fly up and down the walls and within the last 3 days (when they first appeared) have increased exponentially.  They also congregate in the bathroom sink and are drawn (fly) to light when lights are turned on.   How can I get rid of the?  Is it possible at all?  Is there a way to do this in an environmentally friendly fashion.

Any speedy advice you can supply is greatly appreciated.

Linda
 

The best clue that you gave me was that these little black flies are congregating around the sink in the bathroom.

The following questions are now in order:
 

1) Is your sewer hooked up to a municipal system or is it connected to a septic field?

2) Are you using plastic plumbing, or is it copper, galvanized to cast iron?

3) Have you built over an existing sewer system?

4) How old is the private sewer(yours)?

5) Can you describe the flies more by shape and body surface, folded wings tent-like, over-lapping?

6) Are they quick to fly or slow to take off?

Answer these questions for me and we can proceed.

Best wishes Linda,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com


Pest Control Chicago


Exterminator Chicago

 

Jane


Kitchen Bugs


Walked into my dark kitchen early this morning and turned on the light... there were very tiny bugs on the counter.  An inbox-style basket filled with paper goods (recipes, etc.) seemed to be the main area of concentration.  They are extremely small, pear-shaped with the body the larger end of the pear and darker, with small antenna in a V coming from the head.  Antenna are very thin, constantly moving.  Even with antenna included, the bug would only be 1/8" long.  I think they are black, not brown, but hard to tell.  No jumping observed.  So tiny they are just a smudge when swept up with a wet paper towel. I'm wondering if I "caught" them because I turned on the light... will have to try again tomorrow morning.  Any idea what these are?  I live in a top-floor apartment in Hollywood, California.  It's usually very rare to see any kind of bug in my apartment.

Hello Jane--

Your report is quite well stated.  You've described a creature that is soft-bodied enough to leave a smudge when wiped up.  You also report that this is a first for them. as far as you know, because you saw them within and upon loose papers that were apparently placed on the kitchen counter, possibly, the day before.  The fact that they were appearing in a dark room and were, negatively attracted to light may also be a clue.  The body morphology that you describe adds well to the other clues.

All that said, I can guess what you see, but I am reluctant to hone in on possibilities because you reside in a climate where many possibilities exist.  Granted, I'm an entomologist, and relate to target specie by ecological niches, I don't yet visualize the total environ that could propagate such as you are finding.  I presume there is no basement, and that your kitchen is on the ground floor.  What material makes up the construction of your exterior walls?  Have you now, or ever had plumbing or roof leaks or possibly moisture leaking through the building's foundation?

Have you any food stuffs that are purchased recently that could be a carrier of these creatures?  Did you receive packaging material over the holidays that might have introduced the described?

You can send me specimens to 9138 S. Baltimore Ave., Chicago, IL. 60617.

Let me hear the rest of the story as you repeat the performance of the day before

American Pest Solutions
Pest Control Chicago

 

Expanded Question:

I have a mixture of tall red fescue with a blend of blue grass that is supposed to help reseed, in southern California.  I keep getting an insect infestation that I think is eating the roots or something and turning the grass to brown no matter how much I water. 


I see a lot of moths come out of the lawn and what appears to be white flys.  Could they be eating my lawn & how can I control this problem?
I've tried diazanon in the past, now triazinon and even spraying with Pomolive dish soap (green)


Answer:

Sod webworm adults are moths, that can present a problem for your lawn. Browning lawns can be the result of other pests as well. Your predicament may be a concert of pests, not necessarily an either or situation.  Wire worms, which are the immature of the click beetle, can provide damage.  Various beetle grubs, called grub worms may be a factor.

I'd suggest googling these mentioned pests.  Their control will be included with their biology.

I'd be pleased help you further, if this approach does not fill your needs.



Contact me anytime at our office.



Best wishes Don Paganini,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

Pest Control Chicago,

American Pest Solutions

 

Little black bugs


Question:  QUESTION: We had starlings make a nest in our bathroom air vent. Recently we noticed what looked like tiny bits of dust and dirt (pin hole size) on the toilet lid. Fist time I just wiped the seat and lid with bleach. Next time I took a closer look and after staring at the tiny spots I realized they were moving. What are they and how do I get rid of them?

ANSWER: You witnessed a classical condition; whereby bird mites gather inside the home when birds vacate their nests.  Easily killed, use a household pyrethroid class of pesticide such as permethrin, deltamethrin, or some other product recommended by your area pesticide supplier.

You should treat the nesting area where birds have been, to destroy remaining mites.

The problem with doing nothing is the possibility that mites will find you.  Various dermal irritations can be the result of these mites infesting your home.

Without a food supply, the mites will expire in several weeks.  They cannot reproduce on a mammalian host such as you, and will eventually succumb.

Best wishes Rose,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------


QUESTION: Please I need to know will they make my cats their host and if so what do I do? I have kept my cats far away from them and my cats don't seem to be scatching themselfs a lot. Also will they live on my plants? Again I have kept my plants as far away from them as possible.PS we had the nest removed and sprayed and sprayed and sprayed. Thanks again.
 

Answer:  There should not be a further problem after several weeks.  You can spray now but the mite will definitely die out without a bird host.  The nest(s) are now vacant.

You should remove the nesting material, and spray that area as well as the bathroom where these mites were seen.  The mites crawled away from the vacated nests and into you bathroom via ceiling or floor vents.

Best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

 

What is it?


QUESTION: For the past two days I've been dealing with these small little, almost microscopic, bug.  It is tiny, a little smaller than a fruit fly.  A first I thought they were fruit flies but they don't fly.  They are on my kitchen counter, microwave, and ME.  They don not bite when on my skin.  I've been killing them with my fingernails, disinfected my whole kitchen, spraid the corners of my kitchen with a bug killer spray but no success. I have no clue where they are coming from.  I wipe them off the counter and 5 minutes later it's full of them.  They are shaped like a little pear and are black or gray. Can you please help me figure out what they are?

Thanks,


Silvia


ANSWER: These are probably psychodids, called by many colloquial names such as sand fly, moth fly, sewer fly, and psychodid fly.

They breed in drains that allow water to remain in sewer lines for long periods of time, so that a fungus known as slime mold develops, presenting an ideal breeding ground for these creatures.  I have answered this question several times since taking on this volunteer expert position.

I'm more than willing to pursue this with you; however, I don't want to "re-invent the wheel" if I can direct you to a more complete answer on my question/answer history pages.  You can find these by looking up past answers by George Manning.

Please contact me if I have not yet been helpful.

Best wishes,

Follow up QUESTION: Thanks you so much for you immediate response. Unfortunately the little bugs that are in my kitchen do not look nothing like the sewer fly.  The bugs in my kitchen have no wings and aren't fuzzy either.  I'm very desperate at this point.  I constantly feel like they are crawling on me.  Every time I wash dishes or even got to the kitchen I feel them crawling on my arm.  I have two little boys and I'm afraid this bug will get on them.  Is there somewhere that I could go where they could help me identify this bug.  I need to get advice on how to get rid of them.  I live near Chicago. Please HELP!!!

There is no reason why I could not help you with the proper identification.

Answer: According to your description, I am not able to guess what you are talking about.

Please send me specimens so that I can help.  If you have a digital camera, that could help.  The photos can be e-mailed.

I am an entomologist and am able to identify your pests.

Awaiting your next effort

Best wishes

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

Pest Control Chicago


Exterminator Chicago

 

Millipede The centipedes are gone but now I have an even worse problem, there's a millipede in my house. How do I get rid of it?!!!! Millipedes react to dry spells when there is no place for them to locate a humid niche somewhere. They also flee from flooding conditions. Their typical locations are around decomposing vegetation, algae growth, anything composting. When conditions like these are of long-standing, millipedes will enter the home below entrances, via siding, or some other access point. They are easily killed; as a matter of interest, they usually die within the home due to air conditioned air control. They can't last in arid conditions within the home. They are easily killed with any insecticide. Use a permethrin product. It is a pyrethroid, and is a safe pesticide having a low mammalian toxicity. You will find such a product in most locations selling insecticides. Best wishes John, George Manning Consulting Entomologist george@pestproblemssolved.com www.pestproblemssolved.com Pest Control Chicago

 

grasshoppers and red/black stripe lrg beetle looking bug You recommended Neems oil for grasshoppers; where can this product be purchased and how should it be applied? We have a large hard shell bug that is sort of beetle looking. Colors of a ladybug. It is also all over our plants. What is it and would neems oil work for it? Thank you Neem oil has many uses. I am enclosing copied information. As a repellent, you should find the product useful against grasshoppers and stinkbugs. The insect you describe, sounds like a stinkbug. Do you live along the Eastern Seaboard or the Gulf. I'm being asked about these creatures, especially from these areas. Best wishes, George Manning consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com Chicago Pest Control

 

non toxic treatment of fleas indoors/outdoors Hi, My pregnant daughter lives in Dallas, TX. Her Irish Setter (1 yr. old)has fleas- they have have tried bathing him, giving him Frontline and the fleas just keep coming. She also has two indoor cats and one indoor/outdoor cat (that just gave birth to kittens- they are outdoors). Their front and back yards are primarily dirt. They have removed most of the carpets, but still have two rooms to go. Is their treatment for hardwood floors (not stained), outdoors and the animals that is safe for her, her 2 yr son? Is their separate treatments? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Paula Israel Diatomaceous earth dusted outside will help. The "earth" serrates the flea's chitinous surface causing dehydration. The same material can be used indoor, a bit messy, however. EcoPCO-D can be purchased at many pest control supply houses. You can look up the company too. this product can be applied to adult animals as well as to surfaces. Finally, a shallow pan filled with water in which a few drops of dish oil has been added, will drown the jumping fleas. Place pans below windows for easy access by fleas. EcoPCO is a mix of essential plant oils which are non-toxic to human and animal. I hope that I've encouraged you. Best wishes Paula, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com Pest Control Chicago

 

bites
Hi there. I have a lot of bites on my body that I've been getting at night, but I haven't been able to find a bug to confirm what's getting to me. I have laundered all my bedding, checked all over my bare mattress, checked my frame, checked the area around my bed, checked the cracks in the floor, etc. No bugs. But I wake up every morning with more bikes! There is a pigeon roosting on the windowsill off my hallway; it recently had a baby, the baby grew up and flew away, and now it's sitting on a new egg. Could the bites be from pigeon mites? Could they be bed bugs? HOW can I figure this out -- do I just have to wait until I see a bug? Anything I can do in the meantime?


Would appreciate ANY advice, THANK YOU!
 


Answer


Circumstantial evidence leads one to believe that Northern Fowl Mites are getting to you at night.  They are difficult to see due to their coloration and size.  You can use an insecticide of the pyrethroid class of pesticides.  Suspend SC would be a good choice.

Fan spray the walls, floor, and ceiling lightly so as not to allow chemical to run surfaces causing streaks.  This will help after you have sprayed the nest and removed it.

Bird mites will not survive very long without a host.  Your treatment of vacuuming and laundering will add to your success.

If bedbugs were the problem, blood splotches could be seen on sheets, since these bugs regurgitate blood after feeding on a host.
I have answered many such questions which you can find among past answers.

Contact me again if further help is required.

Best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


www.pestproblemssolved.com

george@pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control and Exterminator

 

bites
Hi there. I have a lot of bites on my body that I've been getting at night, but I haven't been able to find a bug to confirm what's getting to me. I have laundered all my bedding, checked all over my bare mattress, checked my frame, checked the area around my bed, checked the cracks in the floor, etc. No bugs. But I wake up every morning with more bikes! There is a pigeon roosting on the windowsill off my hallway; it recently had a baby, the baby grew up and flew away, and now it's sitting on a new egg. Could the bites be from pigeon mites? Could they be bed bugs? HOW can I figure this out -- do I just have to wait until I see a bug? Anything I can do in the meantime?


Would appreciate ANY advice, THANK YOU!


Answer


Circumstantial evidence leads one to believe that Northern Fowl Mites are getting to you at night.  They are difficult to see due to their coloration and size.  You can use an insecticide of the pyrethroid class of pesticides.  Suspend SC would be a good choice.

Fan spray the walls, floor, and ceiling lightly so as not to allow chemical to run surfaces causing streaks.  This will help after you have sprayed the nest and removed it.

Bird mites will not survive very long without a host.  Your treatment of vacuuming and laundering will add to your success.

If bedbugs were the problem, blood splotches could be seen on sheets, since these bugs regurgitate blood after feeding on a host.
I have answered many such questions which you can find among past answers.

Contact me again if further help is required.

Best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


www.pestproblemssolved.com

george@pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control and Exterminator

 

outside roaches QUESTION: My husband spends alot of time on our back porch at night, whether it's reading, drinking coffee, grabbing a smoke, etc. He is also out in the yard very often, working into the dark. Last night, I heard him stomping around, and when he came in he informed me that there were about 20 huge roaches on the porch. I turned on the light and looked, and sure enough, there were several large flying roaches. We are wondering why they all of a sudden appeared on our porch. I have a few theories: they are attracted to the compost pile at the side of our house, but that's been there for over a month, and the roaches just swarmed in last night. I have had dry cat food out for my cat every night, but recently i've added some wet food. But, I've been doing that for a few months also. These roaches were moving fast, too, and just seemed to be generally going crazy. Any opinions, advice, or suggestions??? Thank you!!! ANSWER: Depending on your location, their are a number of outside roaches. Australian, Smoky brown, American, Oriental, Pennsylvania Wood roaches are all outside roaches of size. description would be helpful too. Depending on your location, we can make some recommendations. Jill, looking to hear from you again, I am--- George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com ---------- FOLLOW-UP ---------- QUESTION: ok, to clarify - they were dark brown roaches with wings about 1 and a half inches long, and i saw them fly. what interests me the most is why all of a sudden they were swarming our porch. the next night, no sign of them, and we haven't seen them since. do flying roaches just swarm around, looking for food? or do they stay close to their nests? we live in the Florida panhandle, so it's warm, but not as tropical as south Florida. unfortunately, i never just go out to the porch at night, like i used to, without first turning on the porch light to see if there are roaches crawling around out there. alas, my innocence is lost..... thank you for replying - i do appreciate it! It sounds as if you are experiencing the smoky brown roach. In your part of the Country, they are all called Palmetto bugs. They are wildly attracted to baits such as Maxforce or Avert as a gel or powder. The most practical and inexpensive means of control is to spray weekly around the property with one of the pyrethroid insecticides. You can fog the shrubbery, and cracks and crevices on the outside of the building with a pyrethroid too. I hope I've been helpful. Best wishes, GM

 

Palmetto bugs

Question
ok so here is what happened. i am staying with my mom in florida and my worst fear came true, palmetto bugs. we have seen 3 since we have been living here, over the past 5 years. one in the bathroom and two in my room. i saw a huge one last night walking up my wall. i couldn't sleep a whole night so i decided we must take preventative measures. i don't know how the palmetto bugs are getting in here so we bought boric acid tablets. i put them under my couch, in the corners of my room and in other places in the house, hoping that palmetto bug we saw would be the last. something that i am confused about is this, from what i understand boric acid attracts roaches to it. will the boric acid attract more from outside to come in? my mom said no it will just draw the ones in here to the poison. i dont really understand this mechanism. i believe they're getting under the door so i thought i'd put boric acid tablets over there as well. i know boric acid attracts them and that they don't die immediately from it. my fear was that they would be drawn the doorway and waltz right on in. can you please explain this to me? will this keep the palmetto bugs away and kill whatever ones are present in my home? thankyou.


Answer
Greetings Brittany---

You have received misinformation. You are referring to boric acid tablets. Unless this product is a bait containing boric acid as the active ingredient; the rest of the tablet being an attractant, I don't believe you will receive any benefit from the tablets.

Palmetto bugs are either the Smokey Brown, American roach, or the Australian roach. Each of these are referred to as Palmetto bugs in the region where you are living. They are attracted to poison baits. If you wish to use baits, please look up the following website. www.viewpoints.com/Combat-Source-Kill-Large-Roach-Bait-review-77c6. Bryan Carey goes into detail in a way that can help you and give you peace.

 

roaches Hi, I need help. We live in Maryland (close to DC). For the past a couple months, I have found 3 roaches - one in the basement, one on the first floor and one in the garage today. We have a big yard and for the past 10 years have had 2 or 3 incidents where we found a roach in the basement. We called the exterminator once before (years ago) and was told it was called "chinese" roach (or field roach or something like that). he told us it came in from outside -- we have a walk out basement. The first two (one in the basement and one from the first floor) looked like the "chinese" roach we found before. the one I found today was more of orange-ish and bigger than the two before. We are all really freaking out. none of them looked like house roach. I think the house roaches are darker and leaner than the ones we found. before we call and sign up for hundreds of dollars of contract, we want to check and get some insights.. any help you can provide is greatly appreciated. thanks. jon Pennsylvania wood roach is native to most of North America. It will survive all seasons out of doors. The nymphs vary in coloration from deep,dark brown to almost black. The adult female hah no wings but displays wing pads. She looks like the oriental roach to almost anyone, and can be misdiagnose as such. If you are experiencing this wood roach, their ecological quest is to locate a wooden environment. Shake roofs are the ideal for the wood roach. Moss growing there, breaks down the cellulose, and a more starchy composition can be their fodder as well as the organic composting byproduct. Oriental roaches(Blata orientalis) can also be the problem. They usually find their way into a building via the sewer system. Once within the building, they will seek a humid environment, and can reproduce inside the home. The reason that I point out the wood roach is that you have indicated so few sightings over the years. Ordinary measures of control can be used within the home. These roaches mentioned are both sensitive to a class of insecticides known as pyrethroids. Contact your local supplier, or find one linked to our www.pestproblemssolved.com website. For more detail in controlling wood roaches, you can get back to me or even google control measures on the Web. Best wishes Jonathan, George Manning Consulting Entomologist george@pestproblemssolved.com

 

Expanded Question:

I live in Southern California. Over the last month or so we have had quite a bit of rain, which is not usual for us. About 2 and 1/2 weeks ago I began seeing these gnat-like insects inside my house, which I though were termites. I saved a couple in a bag as they are so easy to catch and gave them to a pest control company and was told by them that they were Phorid flies. All the pictures I find on the web sites do not exactly look like them but their behaviors do match the information I read. They look like gnats to me. I am really freaking out. I have a very, very clean house. I spent over 9-hours this past Saturday cleaning again, unable to find the source. I also have two small dogs that I pick up their feces on a daily basis. I want to know: 1) If the house is exterminated, will it kill the phorid flies, (as well as the spiders that I also have a problem with)?; 2) Are the phorid flies dangerous to my dogs? One web site stated they can live in the digestive tracks of dogs (this has put me over the edge) Is this true? 3)Today I also purchased some Drain Gel online. Is this going to help-in addition to having the house exterminated?

4) How did I get these things and will I ever be able to get rid of them? I even have to cover my bed each day with a big sheet as I have gone in my room to go to sleep at night and found one or two sitting on my bed. I am even having trouble sleeping now because of these things-hoping they don't land on our faces while we sleep. Help! I know I sound nuts but I am feeling nuts lately!

Thank you so much, in advance.

Answer:

Phorid flies, when not flying, have a rapid erratic darting kind of a locomotion. They run before they fly.  Their appearance is gnat-like, that is true.  You can send me samples for identification to American Pest Solutions, Inc., 9137 S. Baltimore, Chicago, IL 60617



You may not be seeing Phorids but possibly Psychodids.  There are some answers to similar questions on my answer record which you can review by scrolling down my answer list.  Google Psychodids and see if this species is what you are seeing.

Slime mould which does breed in drain lines, especially plastic plumbing, could have initiated this condition following severe rain fall.  House hold potted plants will be an excellent site for phorids that will feed on root surfaces and organic substances in the surrounding soil.  They may also be breeding in the garbage disposal.



DF 5000, a fungicide, combined with a pyrethroid such as permethrin can be used in p-traps and other drainage vessels.  



Get back to me after you have reviewed other info on my question roster, and I can be more helpful following your abc effort.



Good Luck Barbara,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

American Pest Solutions

 

insect problem


Hello.


I am having a problem that is directly related to my dog. For the past few monthes i have been dealing with an unknown creature(s) that have me infested. At first i thought that i had a flea problem but know i am beginning to think it's some other type of insect. just about all day and all night everyday (if i sit quietly) i start feeling these very little tiny things crawling on me and occasionally biting me. the areas of my body that are affected are mainly in my shoes and socks and my pants and legs. sometimes i will feel them on my face and in my shirt. judging by their movement, it feels like they are about the size of a grain of sand or a little smaller. everytime i go to look to see what is moving on me and biting me, i cannot find anything at all! i would take numerous samples of the affected area by using s piece of clear scotch tape and applying it to the area in hopes of getting whatever it is to stick to the tape. then i would take my handheld microscope and look to see and i still cannot find anything. i would take samples of my skin, pants, shoes, socks, carpet, my dog, and still nothing. no sign of any fleas or anything else that i know of or at least anything that looks like an insect or something with legs. i have tried many things to eliminate these constant pests or i would like to call them (little juggernuats of hell)! i have used flea bombs, 2 different types of flea killer sprays, 97% rubbing alchol, fire (heat), steam, washing all clothes, pillows and blanket with color safe, bleach, borax, salt, boiling hot water, and many other things i cant quite remember. the flea bombs worked for only 1 night then they came back. i even used 2 bombs that one night in one room (more them recommended) cause i need to sleep and these things are driving me up the wall. boiling hot water seems to work, but i am not too sure on that. for when i used so many chemicals to kill the supposed fleas, my dog would not be in my room. as i know, when i let my dog in my room, 4 days later i have this problem. when i go to do these things, i never let my dog in my room and it takes about 2 weeks for the problem to go away. i just recently started my dog on adavntage and when i took my dog to the groomers for a flea bath, the groomer found only 1 flea on him. so my dog is not infested with fleas and i cannot see any fleas that are crawling and biting on me. just what the hell is it? i have no allergic reactions that i know of and the affected areas do not show any rashes, scars, bumps, or redness or itchyness. also, many of my friends that i have told this problem to, think that my problem is all in my head. i strongly disgree. i have never had this kind of problem ever. what ever these bugs are, they seem to attach themselves within the fibers of the fabrics of my clothes and my blanket. can you please help me? tell me what i am dealing with here. i have spent alot of money trying to eliminate this problem and have done so much. many sleepless nights. i have ran out of options, that is why i am seeking an expert who can help me.
also, if you strongly believe that what i am dealing with is fleas, tell me exactly how big a flea is right when they hatch.


special note:


my dog is a beagle 8 years old and a male


i also have another dog that is some sort of terrier, but this dog nevers enters into my room.


thanks.


Answer

"Paper Mites"

Pin prick-like biting sensations, usually on exposed skin and often producing inflammations that resemble insect bites, can be a persistent problem in some offices. Occupants tend to blame these "bites" on some sort of pest infestation, typically fleas (which are extremely rare in office buildings) or "paper mites" (which do not exist).  Affected spaces are often sprayed with a pesticide in the absence of any evidence that insects are responsible. "Paper mites" are generally a cleaning or indoor air pollution problem rather than a pest problem. Only rarely are the specific culprits in "paper mite" cases positively determined, although there are often strong suspects. Shards of fiber glass insulation (such as from batting above drop ceilings), particles from both newly installed as well as worn carpet and carpet pads, and paper dust from separating forms and computer printouts along tear-lines are some of the most common proven causes of pin prick-like irritations. The dry air of many workplaces not only makes skin more sensitive to these tiny splinters, it increases the static electricity that is responsible for the particles "jumping" onto exposed skin (sometimes the static-charged bits are mistaken for living bugs). Any activity that stirs up accumulated dust, such as office renovation or the purging of old files, often leads to a "paper mite" outbreak. In cases where there is no obvious explanation, or multiple factors are suspected, an industrial hygienist may be called in to investigate.

The Role of Management. The most common mistake of management in "paper mite" situations is to automatically request a pesticide treatment and thereby become liable in the event occupants experience adverse reactions to the chemical. The second most common mistake is for supervisors to dismiss the complaints of biting as total fabrications. Although there are cases where people imagine they are being attacked by unseen parasites, most bite-like sensations in offices involve a genuine source of skin irritation. The circumstances can be further complicated, since health care professionals unfamiliar with the "paper mite syndrome" frequently misdiagnose the resulting welts as insect bites. Others may believe that microscopic dust mites are involved. These are real organisms but cause respiratory distress rather than bites. Finally, it is normal for the coworkers of a person complaining about "paper mites" to develop a heightened sensitivity to their own skin irritations, often simply through the power of suggestion. Management must treat all concerned with sympathy and respect, but emphasize that pesticide treatment cannot be undertaken without positive confirmation that a pest problem exists.

Inspection. An inspection of the affected area should be carried out by a pest control professional who understands that pests may not be involved. Usually when real parasites are present, they are abundant and readily seen. The most common types in office buildings are mites coming from bird nests or from concealed infestations of rodents. Occasionally fleas living on guard or working dogs will bite people who work in the vicinity. If a thorough investigation fails to produce any specimens, a non-pest cause is probably responsible. Nevertheless, it is standard procedure to monitor the area with sticky traps. In addition, occupants should be instructed to capture anything they suspect is biting them on a piece of clear adhesive tape. The PMC will identify all such samples submitted from installations. Even a single parasite specimen is justification for pesticide treatment. However, the captured items are typically bits of debris or tiny, harmless insects that are commonly present in buildings.

Inspection for Airborne Particles. When it is reasonably certain that there are no biting insects in the affected space, the pest control program is no longer involved.

Remedial Action. It is not unusual for a pesticide application to bring temporary relief to occupants with a "paper mite" problem. Part of the relief may be psychological, though sprays do settle irritating particles and decrease static electricity. Although it is unethical and sometimes illegal for pesticides to be used in this fashion, the same results can be obtained by legitimate means. A program of frequent damp cleaning, including carpet washing with water only, is often an effective short-term response while efforts are made to identify and eliminate the source of the irritation. Cleaning by vacuuming rather than wiping is not recommended; unless the vacuum is equipped with a HEPA filter, more dust may become airborne. Use of humidifiers or air purifiers can be of tremendous benefit if the affected space is not too extensive. It may be worthwhile for some employees to seek the advice of a dermatologist or other medical specialist, since techniques such as the use of moisturizers and the avoidance of harsh soaps are frequently prescribed to minimize irritation problems.

This review is from a non-recorded document in my files.  It is not authored by me, nor can I locate its author.

Let me add that there are often medical subtleties that do not get diagnosed.  Not being a physician, and being an entomologist, does not give me license to practice medical advice.  I can talk from past experience when I suggest that thyroid imbalance can sometimes mimic bites as well as side effects from drug therapy.

I hope that I've been helpful.  If you wish, follow up with me so that I can know of your progress.

Best wishes,


George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

 

possible insects in bed....

Hi George-


My boyfriend stored our queen sized mattress and box spring in our shed improperly(basically he threw it in there). I noticed we had some ant issues in our shed and I am really scared that there are bugs nesting in it now. i would like to take it out and use it again (perfect condition) except I am nervous of eggs,bugs etc.. How would I go about cleaning it to get rid of anything in it? Do I bomb it in the shed? Do I take it out and spray it with something or is it better not to chance it?If I use chemicals on it would it be safe to sleep on after?


Thanks


Icked Out,


Amber
 


ANSWER

For your peace of mind, you can spray a mild insecticide over the entire mattress, place it in the sunshine for a few hours on each side.  Cover the mattress with a plastic zipper type cover, and return the mattress to the bed.

One can use a product known as Perm-X, the active ingredient being permethrin. 

The reason I suggest sunlight is that sun will break down the insecticide after usefulness, and will deliver a reduced insecticidal presence, yet, take action against any "crawlers" real or perceived.  By placing the mattress within a plastic covering, you will know if something recurring is still present within the home, and not emanating from the mattress.

I hope I've been helpful Amber,

Best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

george@pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminstor

 

Lisa


Potato Bugs


do potato bugs bite?

Hi Lisa

Potato bugs can bite but I would not say this is usual. Are you identifying a certain ladybug species as a potato bug.  Ladybugs do bite.

American Pest Solutions

Pest Control Chicago

 

Joseph


Powder Post Beetles in Barn


I bought a house 3 tears ago with an old post beam barn.  There was no sign of beetles when we first moved in, now that the barn is being used there are noticeable holes and mountains of dust all over.  One question is could they have been dormant and we disturbed them making them active again?  My second question is that most of my seasoned firewood has been in the barn for two years under the most active area of beetles, is there a chance of them spreading to my home if I bring some of the wood inside?  I appreciate your time, thank you.

Answer: Powder Post Beetles in Barn

Hi Joseph:

Powder post beetles are a generic name for wood boring beetles.  You say there are piles of dust.  If this is a heated barn or if you live in a warm climate, beetles may be active.  If you have firewood, there is a possibility that they can infest seasoned wood.  The piles of wood dust are talc-like in consistency.  This represents the digested wood that is pushed out of an exit opening as the adults emerge.

Some conditions require 90% plus humidity for beetles to remain active.  Other specie may prosper in dry warm conditions.  Without an ID, and more general information, I can send you to the Internet to look up the following: Bostrichids, Anobiids and Lyctids.  You could contact  your university and ask for the Entomology Department.  They may be able to visit you.  An exterminating company that has an entomologist on staff could be helpful.

I'm willing to guide you if you fill me in on temperature, humidity, etc.

Regards,

George Manning


Entomologist

PS; two sites are

http://lancaster.unl.edu/pest/resources/woodDestroying103shlml-39k, and

http;//www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-0823/


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------


QUESTION: Thank you for the response.  I live in Central New York, spring , summer and fall months stay relatively humid, winter months, Nov. thru March can be cold and dry.  Again, I am concerned if I bring the wood in they will spread.  The amount of wood I would bring in will only be in the fire ring for three days at the most.  The rest of the wood will stay in the garage.  Thanks again.

ANSWER: Joseph,  I don't foresee a problem with firewood brought in for immediate use.  Your general concern with the barn can wait for May or June.  At that time test to see if you are finding additional powdery material.  you can keep in touch with me if you like.

Good luck,

George Manning



---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------


QUESTION: One more question, in the spring I am going to tear the barn down, will the beetles then try to go to the closest available wood?
 


No Joseph, if you dispose of the wood as you remove it.  Do your work in early spring before the temperature exceeds 75 degrees.

When completed, or even during the process, use a pyrethroid such as Permethrin in an emulsion application, and spray over the work area periodically.

Good luck,

George Manning

American Pest Solutions
Pest Control Chicago

 

Brian


Powder Post Beetles


Before you set in on me preaching that what I've done wasn't so smart please help if you can. I installed a wainscott paneling in my kitchen out of....yes...barn wood. I noticed the termite damage to the wood before I put it up and could tell it was not active which I still believe is not. But there are pin holes in the wood that I think has powder post beetles in them due to the small piles of wood dust I find about every 2 weeks. I brushed mineral spirits on the wood before installing it which evidentially wasn;t enough. Considering how it is installed to remove it is not an option. Is there anything I can put on the wood or a bug bomb I can set off in my kitchen or anything I can do at this point. I would have thought with really old wood the beetles would have already been in and gone with little left as food in the wood. Do these beetles prefer old style yellow pine? Or is there the chance they could migrate to the studs in my house that are spruce? Will they choose to stay where the "richer" wood is in the barn wood?

Please help! My wife is very upset with me to say the least. But more than anything I don't want these beetles to travel anywhere else.

Thanks,


Brian



Brian--

There are a number of techniques available but the one that would be most abrupt would be for you to create a kind of a temporary build out; whereby, you place a heater and set it not to exceed 110 degrees Fahrenheit.  You would use the wainscot wall as one side of the box affair, while a parallel wall, closed off at either end and on top completes the area to be heated.  You must sustain 110 degrees for 72 hours to totally eliminate these creatures.  The distance between the parallel walls would be 2 feet.

Once you have completed heating the enclosure, you could spray the surface with a product known as Tim-bor which you can purchase from a pesticide supplier in your area.

Insects will not survive the temperature recommended, and your wife can be assured of success.

American Pest Solutions

Pest Control Chicago

 

Powder post beetles

Dear Mr. Manning:
   

In 1985, I bought an 1807 house located just north of Middletown, Connecticut.  There was extensive damage to flooring, joists and sill near the front door, but the powder post beetles that did the damage appeared to be gone. In 1987, I hired a restoration contractor to repair the damage.  The flooring he put in was new, but he decided to replace insect-eaten joists and compromised portions of sill - with beams taken from another old structure.  There was no visible insect activity in the "new" joists and sill at the time of the restoration project.  But some 15 years later, I began to notice little pinholes all of the beams installed by the contractor.  I did not think these significant until a fine powder began to sift out of them.  By this time, it was 2004.  I hired an exterminator.  He immediatley identified the problem as the very one I paid the contractor to correct:  powder post beetles.  The exterminator went into the basement and saturated the affected beams with borates.  "That is the end of your PPB problem", he said.  4 years later, while working on the front of the house, I discovered that the front sill has been largely reduced to "talcum powder".  I have several questions for you:


1.  Do you think it likely that the contractor unwittingly introduced PPB's into the house by using old timbers to restore my house?  Is there any scientific way to be sure if that is what happened?


2.  Was the exterminator justified in thinking that treating interior surfaces with borates would put an end to PPB infestation, or should he have known it was necessary to treat external surfaces as well?


3.  Could the microscopic examination of the frass in my front sill determine when the damage happened?

4.  Are there "consulting entomologists" who could determine exactly what happened to my joists and sill by examining the "scene of the crime"?

I look forward to hearing from you and thank you in advance for trying to answer my questions!
 

Answer


First of all, we need to establish the environmental conditions that afford this yet unidentified species the opportunity to propagate.  The niche factor is always the same.  Creatures will always settle in conditions that afford them the greatest opportunity to assure continuation of their offspring.

There are three families of beetles that can be referred to as powder post beetles.  All the rest have similar affinity for woods, can be found in harvested timber, but selected the wood before it was harvested.  The families called PPB's are Anobiidae, Lyctidae, and, Bostrichidae.

I'm leaning towards Anobiids.  The clues you present are as follows:

1) 1807 New England home. During that era, basements were built of stone.  Fields were full of stone. Farmers cleared these
 fields, using the stones and boulders for construction of 
fences, houses, basements below frame or brick or stone.

2) Basements were often damp. When entering, one felt chilled 
to the bone in winter, and overcome by the dampness during the heat of the summer.

3) Thresholds, close to the ground, resting on stone foundation,
 adjacent to sill plate or joist, captured chronic moisture, creating the right environment for Anobiid spp to settle in.
 The rest of the basement being damp, and of the ideal humidity 
required to set up the reproductive setting, the beetles could,
 and would continue to breed indefinitely.

Regarding Lyctid beetles, the requirements are quite different.  The possibility of continual reproduction presents itself with the ideal wood.  The other environmental factors are not so much the humidity and temperature as compared to the availability of the desired species of wood.

With the Lucid, treatment of the wood, using a borate solution, could be successful.  The larvae already in the wood, would not be destroyed, for the most part, but the re-infestation possibilities 
could be halted.

As to Bostrichids, there are so many species, and they need very particular conditions to successfully propagate their kind.  The chance that they would even re-infest wood from which they emerged 
is much less likely.

With Anobiids, you simply have to change the humidity factor, and you have eliminated them.  Spraying with various insecticides will halt reproduction for a time, but, in the long run, the environment will dictate, the insecticide will cease to protect, and the beetles will still be "marching on".

I hope that I have been helpful.  You can, if you wish, fill me in on the details.  I think all diagnosticians like feedback.

Best wishes,


George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

 

powder post beetles

Question


Mr. Manning,


I bought a hewn log home from Pennsylvania and had it dismantled and moved to Utah.  I am now reassembling it in Sanpete county, Utah and find powder post beetle holes in the wood.  I have found the remains of beetles, but  no living ones yet, although I am just starting my work.  I am wondering if the wood needs treatment or if the low humidity here makes it impossible for the beetles to live here.  What do you recommend if the logs must be treated?

Answer


There are several ways to treat this log; apparently, recently hewn.  I would prefer that it be treated; however, depending on the "powder post beetle", whether in the wood prior to cutting or attacking after the log was cut and prepared, left for a time in storage, an action can be formulated.

Should these holes be made by emerging lyctid, anobiid or bostrichid beetles,a dry climate might help to prevent recycling of beetles in that same wood and other unfinished wood found throughout the house.  This is not an absolute so the use of sustained heat at no less than 110 degrees Fahrenheit for a 72 hour period, will destroy all stages of beetle life within the wood.  A borate salt known as Tim-bor, in a super saturated solution, will prevent re-emergence of larval penetration; however, it will not prevent the emergence of beetles that are ready to exit the wood.  Finally, a restricted pesticide, used only by a licensed technician, can be applied thoroughly over the entire wood surface followed by a complete wrap with plastic over the entire length of this wood specimen.  Keep the log wrapped for no less than 72 hours before finishing the wood. If these holes are made by another species that attacked the wood prior to harvesting it,I would not be concerned about treatment because the emerging beetles will not re-attack the same or similar wood stock since they are interested in a live tree only.

Best regards,

George Manning


consulting entomologist

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Preventing Yellow Jackets and Hornets

We live near Eugene, Oregon on 4 acres, most of which are conifer trees. Last year was our first summer here and we had a terrible infestation of yellow jackets. There were so many that we put out traps (yellow tube-like) and caught hundreds with the traps filling every few days. It hardly made a dent until the very end of the season. We have small garden areas that I can't tend, nor can we sit outside without getting chased by these very aggressive insects. We thought if we put the traps out early during late April to early May, we could trap the queen(s) and prevent the infestation. Unfortunately, we haven't caught anything though we've put over 10 traps on the property surrounding the house and areas where we caught them last year. When we tried the traps last year, the pheromone packet didn't seem to work, so we used various meats, turkey worked the best. This year, nothing seems to work yet. Now when I walk outside, I'm getting chased (though these could be bees), and can tell by looking outside there are wasps flying around. I can't tell if they are yellow jackets, however. I also see wasps collecting wood from our fence. Is it too late now to try to catch the queen before she starts laying eggs? This house is wonderful but the thought of staying indoors for months to avoid getting stung is getting me down. The nests could be anywhere on our property or one of the neighbors, all with acreage. What can we do to prevent these huge populations of yellow jackets?
 


You describe your four acres as heavily planted in conifers.  You state that you have been seeing more and more yellow jackets and bees. These trees are the host plants of aphid-like insects that cover themselves with a white waxy substance which they produce while sucking the sap from these conifers.  When these insects, known as adelgids start appearing, they are vulnerable to pesticides.  Later, when covered with wax, they are not so easily killed.

Aphids are also attracted to the conifers, suck up sap, but don't do as much damage to the trees as do the adelgids.  If you mix a soap solution that can be sprayed over the trees in the early Spring, and repeat this performance several times, you might be able to reduce the yellow jacket/other wasp problems somewhat.  The soapy solution will kill the aphids and also the early, not yet waxed adelgids.

Bees and many wasp specie are attracted to the excretion from these small, sap-sucking insects.  Bees actually produce a honey from the excrement which is known as honey dew honey.  Both wasps, and bees consume this bi-product of conifer sap.  Ants also feed on the honey dew.  You may be able to see ants carrying aphids back to their colony where they store aphids, and milk them by massaging them so they release the honey dew.

Wasps and yellow jackets, which are also wasps, carry these small insects back to their colonies where other house wasps prepare the aphids and adelgids for the queen and larvae to consume.

I would think that after a few seasons, you could reduce the wasp population by combining the pheromone trap system with the soap approach.  See if the entomology department at the university agrees with my thinking.

It would seem that if the plant suckers are diminished so would be the wasps in time.

As regards these creatures chasing you, I'm not sure that this is a reality.  You are interpreting their attention to you as an aggressive stinging behavior.  These creatures are often attracted to prespiration, as well as perfume.  Unless you inadvertently squeeze one under your arm or under your clothing, they should not sting.  Wasps and bees sting for defense purposes only.  Should you find a wasp nest, and if you focus on spraying the wasp nest entrance, so as to prevent the inhabitants from flying out and stinging, you will not be stung by those members that are already flying and returning to their colony.  Those inside are programmed to defend, and those returning are programmed to bring home the groceries, and are not interested in you.

I hope I've been somewhat helpful.  It sounds like you are really living in God's country.

Best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


george@pestproblemssolved.com

www.pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control


Chicago Exterminator

 

Roach Infestation: Condo Complex I just moved into my brand new condo and was immediately confronted with a cockroach infestation. I have taken the steps to eliminate them from my property the best I can, but I know that they are lurking in units around me. I have contacted the HOA about this problem and they have stated that they cannot do anything because it is a HUD. What steps do I need to take in order to get this taken care of? You should report this condition to the condo board. They will be able to instruct you in the proper approach to taking care of this condition. Apparently, the previous occupant did not disclose this problem to you nor to the board. There may be a general problem in the building, and the board is aware of it. The name, roach, can cover a minimum of five species, more, if you live in some southern states. Unless you recognize this roach species, you will need a correct identification. Certainly, you should get the facts before you take on the extermination all by yourself. There are very specific condo rules regarding such conditions. Regards, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com Pest Control Chicago

 

Sand Bees

Hi,  I have a man made beach at my home by my pool.  For 2 years now during the summer I have hundreds of what I now found out to be sand bees swarming above the sand and digging underneath.  They don't seem to bother humans, but I'm concerned for smaller children being around in the sand.  Do these bees sting and are they aggressive (they don't seem to be).  Should I try to kill them or do they serve an important purpose.  They sure do make some big mounds in my sand.  Thanks for your help.

Answer
 
There are no sand bees to my knowledge; however, there are numerous specie of sand wasps all belonging to a Hymenopterous family known as Sphecidae. 

Sand wasps are solitary wasps.  They present no threat to youngsters playing in the sand.  They can sting but do not disturb humankind so far as I know.

In my own experience, I have found numerous females racing over sand, flipping their wings, entering and exiting from small holes in sand.  Since they produce only a few offspring and do not colonize as a single entity, they are known as solitary wasps.  These creatures have a homing instinct that causes them to return year after year to the same location.  They are beneficial, collecting volumes of flies and other unwanted pests, which they stuff into cells where their offspring are developing, and feeding on the feed supply of insect life collected for their benefit.

Best wishes Bern,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

www.pestproblemssolved.com

george@pestproblemssolved.com


Chicago Pest Control and exterminator

 

Sand Wasp Hi George, I have a problem on my beach that seems to be over run by hundreds of sand wasps. I know that they have solitary nests, and i have tried to turn up the sand, with a rake and shovel, spray it down with cans of bee spray and turn it up[ some more and spray it down again. The next day, they were still there. Do you know a way to rid my beach of these guys? Thanks Sand wasp control is not possible when there are an ample supply of these insects. Better that you tarp the area that you wish to use so that wasps will not have nested in that location. The use of EcoPCO, a natural insecticide, which is made up of a number of essential plant oils, is available in dust form. Try using this product in areas that you wish to occupy. Possibly placing the borders of the tarp with the dust, will prevent them from digging under the margins of the tarp. When you wish to regain the use of the particular section that you have protected, remove the tarp. You will eventually become savvy about the nesting persistance. I would expect the activity to slow down as the season lengthens. Possibly August and September will be better months for using the beach. The wasps will be around but will less likely be nesting anymore. Let me know how successful you have become using this method. I believe you will succeed. Best wishes Tony, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com george@pestproblemssolved.com ed.com Pest Control Chicago

 

Sand Bees


Hi,  I have a man made beach at my home by my pool.  For 2 years now during the summer I have hundreds of what I now found out to be sand bees swarming above the sand and digging underneath.  They don't seem to bother humans, but I'm concerned for smaller children being around in the sand.  Do these bees sting and are they aggressive (they don't seem to be).  Should I try to kill them or do they serve an important purpose.  They sure do make some big mounds in my sand.  Thanks for your help.
 

There are no sand bees to my knowledge; however, there are numerous specie of sand wasps all belonging to a Hymenopterous family known as Sphecidae. 

Sand wasps are solitary wasps.  They present no threat to youngsters playing in the sand.  They can sting but do not disturb humankind so far as I know.

In my own experience, I have found numerous females racing over sand, flipping their wings, entering and exiting from small holes in sand.  Since they produce only a few offspring and do not colonize as a single entity, they are known as solitary wasps.  These creatures have a homing instinct that causes them to return year after year to the same location.  They are beneficial, collecting volumes of flies and other unwanted pests, which they stuff into cells where their offspring are developing, and feeding on the feed supply of insect life collected for their benefit.

Best wishes,

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


www.pestproblemssolved.com

george@pestproblemssolved.com


Chicago Pest Control and Exterminator

 

Subject:  Seriously creepy bugs in home 


Question:  I moved into this apartment last summer; its a very old brownstone in the city and has about 35 units.  I've always seen a roach here or there (various exterminator companies said that was "unavoidable" if the landlord does not spray the entire building regularly).

But every day for the past 3 days I encountered THE MOST HORRIFYING bug I have EVER seen.  I can't even LOOK at the beast, let alone kill it.

Its body was about 2 inches in length, and its awful spindly little legs made it look 6 inches long.  Maybe 12 legs, though a couple look like antennae?  Its body is striped with grayish-yellow and brown.  It climbs walls, ceilings with ease and its FAST.  Its so awful I could cry!  It reminds me of a massive silverfish, but I'm sure its not one.

Funny thing is, a few weeks before these beasts came out I noticed a DRAMATIC increase in german cockroaches.

Would spraying only my unit do any good?  What about a bomb?  Is there anything I can do?

Thanks for donating your time to this website!
 


Answer:  You are describing what is known as a centipede.  As you relate an increase in german cockroaches, it may be possible that interior climate circumstances brought about this noticeable change.

High humidity is attractive to both roaches and centipedes.  When the environment becomes excessively dry; whereby, you feel the need to add moisture to the air, these creatures may be less noticeable, since they will attempt to confine themselves to the more humid locations of your building.

Centipedes readily lose moisture content in an arid environment.  Since they are purely predaceous, and hunt in such preferred locations,their presence on a frequent basis is influenced by humidity.

Centipedes are easily killed, and can be killed by spraying one of a class of insecticides known as pyrethroids.  I am enclosing a university fact sheet that will give you more information.

If you wish to correspond further, please do so.  I will try to be more prompt in my response.  I prepared my answer several days ago, and was interrupted.  I thought that I'd already sent you an answer to your inquiry

George Manning


Consulting Entomologist


www.pestproblemssolved.com
g

eorge@pestproblemssolved.com

Chicago Pest Control

 

Ray


Silverfish


Dear Mr. Manning:


I have been having a silverfish problem for several months.  I have used two exterminators but they keep coming back.  I need help.  My home is brick and frame; it is partially on a slab and part on a crawlspace (I had new drain tiles, sumps, concrete floor and perimeter wall insulation done in the crawl about a year ago.  I have lived here for over 20 years, and this is the first time I am having this problem.  HELP!!!!


Thank you (and my family thanks you too!).  


Sincerely,


Ray


Hello Ray--

Before we think -- solution, we should consider the recent changes to your home that you folks recently undertook.  Let's look at each item as it may pertain to silverfish ecology:

1)Crawl space insulation -- Is it batted?
 

2)Apparently, you have corrected some drainage issues.  
   Is there a humidity factor in the crawl space at this 
   time?
 

3)Additionally, did you do a teardown of your roof?
 

4)Do you live in a wooded area?

Silverfish are attracted to the starches used as stiffeners in Batt type insulation.  Humidity from the foundation wall could accelerate the attractiveness of the batt.  The right conditions can be the jump-start that will stimulate silverfish reproduction.

Often, when an old roof is removed, silverfish that were surreptitiously living under an old shake roof, and, or between layers of roofing too, could be running for cover, into the attic space.  When there, they find the aging insulation, and begin feeding on the batt paper.  You will often find the paper backing veinated as a result of their feeding.  Conditions being ideal, these insects may migrate to the base of the house via the soffited stack pipe enclosure.

Silverfish could have been delivered from the building supplier's warehouse where they may abide in large numbers.

Finally, in nature, several specie of silverfish and firebrats enjoy the environ surrounding the home when that home is situated within their territory.

Now, solving the problem is your reason for contacting me.

I am giving you a collective solution that will destroy an existing population, no matter how attractive is the home's ecological silverfish niche.  You should ask your exterminator to use Tim-Bor, or NiBan, both borate salts.  You can even blend these with diatomaceous earth or silica gel(equally useful as quasi-synergists) to make the powdered material more flocculent and floatable.  If you or your exterminator use a Centrobulb fitted with a six inch brass tub, wherein the screen inside the cap is removed, you will get ideal powder coverage with excellent static charge so that the powder will optimally adhere to the surfaces targeted.  You will want to project powder lightly over the actual batt and within cracks and crevices throughout the house.  in addition to this application, preferably before the powder work begins, fan-spray a solution of SUSPEND(Deltamethrin) over exposed surfaces where silverfish are seen.  Allow the insecticide to be almost dry before initiating the powder work.

Good luck and let me know if I've helped.  It's always nice to get a response where such space is provided.

Contact a supplier for these items if you will perform the work yourself.

American Pest Solutions
Pest Control Chicago

slugs and water bugs I live off a side street mainly in town. In my subdivision there is a feild, stream, and a pond nearby. I do not nor does any neighbors have a garden, I personally have no flower beds or plants. My house is fairly normal and dry. But I have a HUGE!!! problem with slugs and water bugs. They do not come inside (except garage) and only see them come out at night. I have had professional spraying and it only last a couple of months. I am tired of walking outside at night, I can't enjoy my yard or porch without seeing 20/30 bugs each night. They crawl on the side of my house to. Please help me I would like to use a humane way of dealing with them, no salt for slugs I don't want to torture them if I can help it. In an ecological way the two species may be considered via one method of extermination. Each of these, the waterbugs(Oriental, and American roaches) seek a humid environment, as well as the slugs. Slugs become active at night, and so do the waterbugs. The sewer system is a source of waterbug breeding. If little sunlight falls upon the walls of your garage, it is entirely possible that nesting goes on behind walls, say behind vinyl sided walls. a garage floor drain remaining moist could harbor waterbugs too. If you are able to change the humid condition at this location, you will be doing the greatest share of the work through altering the environment. An inexpensive method of extermination could be the use of diatomaceous earth, which you would dust over the perimeter of the garage, sidewalk, or any other surfaces that are frequented now. Rain will wash away most of the product, so that application should be repeated until the condition abates. The use of EcoPCO dust can effect a rapid kill of the waterbugs too. You might consider working with both these products. They can also be applied together to enhance the speed of elimination. Please select an agricultural grade diatomaceous earth. You can contact me further if there are additional questions. Good luck, George Manning Consulting Entomologist www.pestproblemssolved.com Pest Control Chicago

 

Expanded Question:

I live in Richmond, VA (approx. 2 hours south of D.C.) I have slugs come into my house (How they do it I don't know. I patched the only hole I could find near where they are) in my kitchen, next to my cat's food bowl. How do I get rid of them, and could they be attracted to my cat's food (it's dry food, and there's food in the bowl all day.)?


Answer:

Slugs will not travel along a dry area of floor.  Please give me location in relation to moisture such as a basement humid situation, drainage issues, proximity to exterior, humid situations, inverted plant pots, etc.



I'll get a better way to help if you elaborate in this recommended vein.



Thanks David, keep me posted,



George Manning


American Pest Solutions

 

Expanded Question:

We just moved to Tampa, Florida.  Before we moved in the house was vacant and had a lot of dead bugs inside.  We have hired a pest company and that problem seems to have been resolved.  Recently, we've noticed tiny black ants coming from the yard or garden beds coming up the walls of our outside of the house and going into the attic.  I haven't seen any in the house.  Why are they doing this and how can I control them.  I've creating a boric acid barrier around the house to spraying boric acid in my attic.  Any suggestions would be helpful.


Answer:

A boric acid barrier can be helpful in reducing the foraging ants.  This may not halt the activity within the colony.  Ants will continue to be generated by the laying queen or queens. Ants follow pheromone trails that are set down by earlier travellers that have found a food source.  The intensity of the trail brings about additional ants that continue back and forth along a verified food trail.  When ants are killed, this may not be enough to destroy a colony.  I suggest that you test their trail by placing grated cheese in their path, and also a bottlecap  filled with honey, in order to see if either will cause the activity to swing to your test site.  After a time, say an hour, ants should be telling you which bait they prefer. You will then know if you should purchase a protein or a carbohydrate bait. 

When ready, contact the supplier of your choice or go to our website and link to the supplier in our link list.

Bait continually until ants no longer take the bait.  Ants store large quantities of food that they prefer.  Once they have carried their desired fill, the process of destruction will take a while.  Allow three weeks before you feel that its taking too long.  Do not use any boric acid during this kill time.  The foragers are your aids in destroying the colony.  If they are stopped by alternative killing methods, you lose on the baiting approach.  



Liquid and gel baits will eventually destroy foragers because they will carry these substances in their crops(storage stomachs), and  they will eventually succumb.  Dry granular baits are carried by the mandibles, and are not ingested on the way to the colony.



One other footnote is that as the ants focus, you will know if they originate from the attic or from the yard, since their trailing will be to and from their colony.



For further ant information, there are other ant postings from previous questions asked of me.

Brian best wishes and ask further if need be,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

Pest Control Chicago

American Pest Solutions

 

Expanded Question:

We have found small hard brown bits in the draw where we keep our knives an forks. At first we thought it was something that had fallen in the draw (like pips).  We cleared it up, however it keeps reappearing.  We can not see why any pest would be drawn there as there is no food. What do you think it could be?  We can not see how it would get in.

Answer:

Small brown excrement may come from mice even though you have no food there.  Not knowing where you reside, I have no clue as to what species of rodent is leaving droppings.



There are some large roaches that leave fairly large dropping also.



You can mail this scat to me at 9138 S. Baltimore, Chicago, IL 60617.  I will be able to I.D. the creature by viewing this evidence.  



Thanks for your inquiry Andy,



Regards,



George Manning


Consulting Entomologist

Pest Control Chicago

American Pest Solutions

 

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